IBM Atomic Shorts: The sound of moving atoms



See the world’s smallest movie at What’s the weird noise the scientists hear when they move atoms? In this Atomic Short, IBM scientists talk more about what makes that scratchy sound, and how it helps them move atoms. Learn more about atomic memory, data storage and big data at

30 Replies to “IBM Atomic Shorts: The sound of moving atoms”

  1. Or you know, read about subatomic structure and properties on the massive database of information that YouTube is hanging from. Doesn't change how amazing it is to consider that this understanding and execution is descended from the knowledge collected by generations of people, from a species evolved from a long and frankly unreliable process of chance elimination which began at some self replicating single-celled life-forms (who's origin seems even more miraculous.) What makes this not cool?

  2. but they are not moving atoms, they are moving molecules… the fact that it is shown an atom it's a totally different story. Those atoms create a covalent bond.

  3. Are the 7*10^27 atoms standard or are there more if the persons body is bigger then another person? Ex: A person 5' 6" is smaller then a person 6' 5".

  4. Start by taking AP science classes in high school, do research internship in high school as well, get into a good college, do research while in college, get your degree, go to grad school and do your research. eventually get a Ph.D and get a kickass job like this one

  5. build a computer able to store data based on atom position. That would increase storage capasity to what, trillion bits per square cm?.

  6. Did you know that 99% of atom is prue empty space. It means that you, the table that you seat and the computer that you wathc now is 99% of nothing. 

  7. wait …..three "locations?" is that the smallest unit of space an atom can move like a plank length??? this video ended on a massive mystery that is now solved? is he saying that they were hearing atoms move from one quanta to another? so reality is made of a giant 3d grid where there are atom sized spaces and they click iin place and can even be uncomfortably superpositioned in two "locations" over??

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