The plane flying to the ions, the mystery of the square cacas and the evaporated water

      Comments Off on The plane flying to the ions, the mystery of the square cacas and the evaporated water
<p class = "canvas-atom-canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "

In the scientific news of the week, the first ion-powered aircraft, the elasticity of the wombat bowels, artefacts on the satellite images of Mars make believe the presence of water, and the future rover of NASA will fetch life in a delta.

"data-reactid =" 22 ">

In the scientific news of the week, the first ion-powered aircraft, the elasticity of the wombat bowels, artefacts on the satellite images of Mars make believe the presence of water, and the future rover of NASA will fetch life in a delta.

The four scientific news that caught our attention this week.

The plane flying at ions

<p class = "canvas-atom-canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = ""Since the first flight more than one hundred years ago, planes have been propelled by moving parts such as propellers and turbines. Most rely on fossil fuel combustion – and others, like the now famous Solar Impulse, fly with solar energy. But the experience of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, introduced by these few words in Nature this week, paves the way for a new kind of technology: ionic propulsion. No moving parts, almost total silence, and zero CO2 emissions. The plane of the future, when it will fly a little further than 60 meters in a gym? "Data-reactid =" 25 ">"Since the first flight more than one hundred years ago, planes have been propelled by moving parts such as propellers and turbines. Most rely on fossil fuel combustion – and others, like the now famous Solar Impulse, fly with solar energy. But the experience of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, introduced by these few words in Nature this week, paves the way for a new kind of technology: ionic propulsion. No moving parts, almost total silence, and zero CO2 emissions. The plane of the future, when it will fly a little further than 60 meters in a gymnasium?

The prototype ion-powered aircraft built by Steven Barrett and his team from the aerospace department is still a model: he weighs 2.45 kilos. Under its wings of 5 meters wingspan, electrodes, powered by a battery of 600 watts, in a wired structure to air clothes rack, create an electric field in the air. Molecules thus electrically charged become ions. Positive ions move from the anode to the cathode (both types of electrodes), creating "ionic wind" and a push that makes the ultralight aircraft fly.

Operation of MIT's ion-propelled aircraft prototype, which flew almost 60 meters in 2018. (AFP Infographic)

Ionic engine technology is already being used in spacecraft – the Dawn spacecraft in particular, whose mission to the asteroids Vesta and Ceres has just been completed. But accelerated ions in space do not come from the surrounding air (obviously) but (…)

<p class = "canvas-atom-canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Read more on Liberation.fr

Why wombats do square poop
March: liquid water was a bug
Stanislas Dehaene: "Learning is what characterizes our species"
Emmanuelle Amar, warned and against all
How much weighs a kilo?
"data-reactid =" 30 ">Read more on Liberation.fr

Why wombats do square poop
March: liquid water was a bug
Stanislas Dehaene: "Learning is what characterizes our species"
Emmanuelle Amar, warned and against all
How much weighs a kilo?