NVIDIA Corp. Reportedly Prepping GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — The Motley Fool

In May 2016, graphics chip specialist NVIDIA (NASDAQ:NVDA) began rolling gaming-oriented graphics processors based on its then-new Pascal architecture. The first products out of the chute were the GeForce GTX 1070 and its more powerful sibling, the GeForce GTX 1080, targeted at the high-end of the personal computer gaming market.

These processors were notable because they delivered substantial improvements in performance and power efficiency over their predecessors, thanks to the use of a new manufacturing technology, as well as significant design work on NVIDIA’s part. 

Since then, NVIDIA has released additional gaming products based on its Pascal architecture, including lower-power, lower-cost GPUs like the GeForce GTX 1060 and GeForce GTX 1050, and higher-end offerings like the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and the brawny Titan Xp for gamers willing to spend big bucks for the best possible performance.

The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti.

Image source: NVIDIA.

GPUs based on the Pascal architecture have been hugely successful for NVIDIA, helping to power significant growth in both the company’s gaming business and its booming data center accelerator business.

Per rumors from MyDrivers and Baidu, spotted by graphics card-oriented news website VideoCardz, NVIDIA is preparing a new Pascal-based graphics processor for the gaming market, to be called the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

Slotting in between the 1070 and 1080

NVIDIA’s MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 is $379 (though good luck finding one at this price, thanks to the cryptocurrency mining boom, which has dramatically increased demand for the GTX 1070, as well as other graphics processors). The GeForce GTX 1080’s MSRP sits $120 higher at $499.

Based on NVIDIA’s traditional naming scheme, the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti should be a higher-end product than the GeForce GTX 1070 but would sit lower than the GeForce GTX 1080 on both pricing and performance.

How might NVIDIA price the 1070 Ti?

I see two possible scenarios with respect to the potential MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — assuming, of course, that it’s real and comes to market.

First, it could simply sit smack-dab in the middle of the GeForce GTX 1070 and GeForce GTX 1080 on the pricing table at around $439. The purpose of a GPU at that price would be to try to upsell potential GeForce GTX 1070 buyers who aren’t quite ready to drop the cash required on the GeForce GTX 1080.

That could work, but the added revenue from those upsells could be offset if some potential GeForce GTX 1080 buyers opted to go down a notch to the new GPU, saving some money with a product that’s “close enough” in performance.

Another possibility — and, frankly, it’s one that I think is more sensible — would be that NVIDIA would drop pricing on the GeForce GTX 1070, then slot in the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti at the about the price point that earlier product previously occupied.

Such a move would have the effect of increasing the performance-per-dollar of some of its offerings, potentially stimulating demand during the holiday season (which, not-so-coincidentally, is when several high-profile PC games are set to launch).

Ashraf Eassa has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends NVIDIA. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

NVIDIA Corp. Reportedly Prepping GeForce GTX 1070 Ti | Business Markets and Stocks News

In May 2016, graphics chip specialist NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) began rolling gaming-oriented graphics processors based on its then-new Pascal architecture. The first products out of the chute were the GeForce GTX 1070 and its more powerful sibling, the GeForce GTX 1080, targeted at the high-end of the personal computer gaming market.

These processors were notable because they delivered substantial improvements in performance and power efficiency over their predecessors, thanks to the use of a new manufacturing technology, as well as significant design work on NVIDIA’s part. 

Since then, NVIDIA has released additional gaming products based on its Pascal architecture, including lower-power, lower-cost GPUs like the GeForce GTX 1060 and GeForce GTX 1050, and higher-end offerings like the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and the brawny Titan Xp for gamers willing to spend big bucks for the best possible performance.

GPUs based on the Pascal architecture have been hugely successful for NVIDIA, helping to power significant growth in both the company’s gaming business and its booming data center accelerator business.

Per rumors from MyDrivers and Baidu, spotted by graphics card-oriented news website VideoCardz, NVIDIA is preparing a new Pascal-based graphics processor for the gaming market, to be called the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

Slotting in between the 1070 and 1080

NVIDIA’s MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 is $379 (though good luck finding one at this price, thanks to the cryptocurrency mining boom, which has dramatically increased demand for the GTX 1070, as well as other graphics processors). The GeForce GTX 1080’s MSRP sits $120 higher at $499.

Based on NVIDIA’s traditional naming scheme, the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti should be a higher-end product than the GeForce GTX 1070 but would sit lower than the GeForce GTX 1080 on both pricing and performance.

How might NVIDIA price the 1070 Ti?

I see two possible scenarios with respect to the potential MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — assuming, of course, that it’s real and comes to market.

First, it could simply sit smack-dab in the middle of the GeForce GTX 1070 and GeForce GTX 1080 on the pricing table at around $439. The purpose of a GPU at that price would be to try to upsell potential GeForce GTX 1070 buyers who aren’t quite ready to drop the cash required on the GeForce GTX 1080.

That could work, but the added revenue from those upsells could be offset if some potential GeForce GTX 1080 buyers opted to go down a notch to the new GPU, saving some money with a product that’s “close enough” in performance.

Another possibility — and, frankly, it’s one that I think is more sensible — would be that NVIDIA would drop pricing on the GeForce GTX 1070, then slot in the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti at the about the price point that earlier product previously occupied.

Such a move would have the effect of increasing the performance-per-dollar of some of its offerings, potentially stimulating demand during the holiday season (which, not-so-coincidentally, is when several high-profile PC games are set to launch).

10 stocks we like better than Nvidia

When investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now… and Nvidia wasn’t one of them! That’s right — they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of September 5, 2017

Ashraf Eassa has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends NVIDIA. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

NVIDIA Corp. Reportedly Prepping GeForce GTX 1070 Ti | Markets-and-stocks

In May 2016, graphics chip specialist NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) began rolling gaming-oriented graphics processors based on its then-new Pascal architecture. The first products out of the chute were the GeForce GTX 1070 and its more powerful sibling, the GeForce GTX 1080, targeted at the high-end of the personal computer gaming market.

These processors were notable because they delivered substantial improvements in performance and power efficiency over their predecessors, thanks to the use of a new manufacturing technology, as well as significant design work on NVIDIA’s part. 

Since then, NVIDIA has released additional gaming products based on its Pascal architecture, including lower-power, lower-cost GPUs like the GeForce GTX 1060 and GeForce GTX 1050, and higher-end offerings like the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and the brawny Titan Xp for gamers willing to spend big bucks for the best possible performance.

GPUs based on the Pascal architecture have been hugely successful for NVIDIA, helping to power significant growth in both the company’s gaming business and its booming data center accelerator business.

Per rumors from MyDrivers and Baidu, spotted by graphics card-oriented news website VideoCardz, NVIDIA is preparing a new Pascal-based graphics processor for the gaming market, to be called the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

Slotting in between the 1070 and 1080

NVIDIA’s MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 is $379 (though good luck finding one at this price, thanks to the cryptocurrency mining boom, which has dramatically increased demand for the GTX 1070, as well as other graphics processors). The GeForce GTX 1080’s MSRP sits $120 higher at $499.

Based on NVIDIA’s traditional naming scheme, the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti should be a higher-end product than the GeForce GTX 1070 but would sit lower than the GeForce GTX 1080 on both pricing and performance.

How might NVIDIA price the 1070 Ti?

I see two possible scenarios with respect to the potential MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — assuming, of course, that it’s real and comes to market.

First, it could simply sit smack-dab in the middle of the GeForce GTX 1070 and GeForce GTX 1080 on the pricing table at around $439. The purpose of a GPU at that price would be to try to upsell potential GeForce GTX 1070 buyers who aren’t quite ready to drop the cash required on the GeForce GTX 1080.

That could work, but the added revenue from those upsells could be offset if some potential GeForce GTX 1080 buyers opted to go down a notch to the new GPU, saving some money with a product that’s “close enough” in performance.

Another possibility — and, frankly, it’s one that I think is more sensible — would be that NVIDIA would drop pricing on the GeForce GTX 1070, then slot in the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti at the about the price point that earlier product previously occupied.

Such a move would have the effect of increasing the performance-per-dollar of some of its offerings, potentially stimulating demand during the holiday season (which, not-so-coincidentally, is when several high-profile PC games are set to launch).

10 stocks we like better than Nvidia

When investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now… and Nvidia wasn’t one of them! That’s right — they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of September 5, 2017

Ashraf Eassa has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends NVIDIA. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Nvidia’s rumoured GTX 1070 Ti is a needless final shot at AMD’s Vega

Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti specs

There are fresh rumours filtering out of forums in Scandinavia and the East that Nvidia are prepping a new Pascal-based hammer to bash that final nail into the AMD Vega coffin. That card is apparently the Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti.

Your graphics card deserves a good screen, so feed it one of the best gaming monitors around to see it blossom.

Now before we get too excited the only source for this is some snap that’s been circulating around the intermawebs appearing to show an Asus rig with a GTX 1070 Ti GPU inside it. That’s it. No one’s been able to confirm whether there is any shred of truth to the rumour or whether it’s just some Asus intern dropping extraneous letters onto their marketing shizzle.

But that hasn’t stopped the rumour getting fleshed out with alleged specifications, touting a GP104 GPU with either 2,048 or 2,304 CUDA cores inside and 8GB of video memory. For reference, the existing GTX 1070 has 1,920 cores and the GTX 1080 has 2,560. The former sounds more likey, as it would otherwise sit far too close to the GTX 1080 for comfort.

Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti

There’s always a chance that this is just evidence of Nvidia getting bored. With the spluttering launch that has been AMD’s RX Vega cards there’s almost no impetus for the GeForce engineers to move any quicker with the new Nvidia Volta GPU architecture. Any new Pascal release would kinda be like kicking a sickly puppy.

The existing Pascal cards are quick, efficient, and available which makes it very difficult for anyone to make a case for buying new AMD graphics silicon. Nvidia’s CEO has gone on record during a recent super-serious investor briefing saying that for the foreseeable future “Pascal is just unbeatable.”

So, the only reason for Nvidia to want to release an updated Pascal chip with the GTX 1070 Ti card is because they’re either bored or determined to stick another brogue into AMD’s bruised ribs. Maybe this is why Radeon Tech Group’s Raja Koduri has decided to take a break from GPU whispering until the start of next year – he knows there’s more punishment on the horizon.

Poor Vega...

The other big question everyone’s asking is where the hell will the GTX 1070 Ti fit into the existing graphics stack? There’s not a lot of clear air between the current GTX 1070 and GTX 1080, either in performance terms or pricing, so dropping a new card in between will surely cannibalise the sales of its older siblings. I guess there’s always the possibility of a price cut for the GTX 1070 to give a little space to the Ti card, but given the current pricing struggles of AMD’s GPUs there’s little need for that.

Whatever the truth of it, however, none of this makes for pleasant reading for AMD’s graphics card fans.

NVIDIA Rumored To Launch Pascal GeForce GTX 1070 Ti Graphics Card

So NVIDIA GeForce has been a silent bunch since the launch of the highly successful GeForce GTX 1080 Ti but rumor is that a new card may possible be in the works. Posted over at Chinese sources and caught by Videocardz, this new card is rumored to be known as the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

NVIDIA Rumored To Launch a Pascal Based GeForce GTX 1070 Ti Graphics Card With 8 GB G5 Memory

First of all, I would like to state that there’s no official confirmation of any sorts regarding this SKU so all of the details are rumors at best. The details allege that NVIDIA is working on what is to be a brand new Pascal graphics card. The card will be known as the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti and feature a Pascal GP104 silicon.

Technically, this card will be similar to the GP104 based GTX 1080 and GTX 1070. The differences will lie in the configuration of the chip itself. It is stated that the GTX 1070 Ti will come with 2304 CUDA Cores and 8 GB of GDDR5 memory along a 256-bit bus interface. Now this looks to be an interesting graphics card as it will be sandwiched in between the GTX 1070 and GTX 1080.

To be honest, that gap isn’t too huge to begin with. Also worth noting is that the GeForce GTX 1080 is retailing for $499 US while the GTX 1070 has an official MSRP of $349 US. The only price point I can think in between them is $399-$449. The former is too close to a GTX 1070 while the latter is close to a GTX 1080. And let’s just not talk about the GTX 1070 custom models which fall in the same price segment.

So maybe we are looking at a price drop on the GTX 1070 to around $299 US and a sudden intro of the GTX 1070 Ti after that. I know it sounds really weird but the only reason this rumor was worth a post was due to a picture a guy took with his mobile showing what seems to be ASUS’s GTX 1070 Ti STRIX OC (8 GB) model. Whether that’s true or not is yet to be confirmed but we will have a word with our sources if they have more details on the card. And no, Volta isn’t coming this year.



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The best Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti graphics cards

Since its launch in March 2017, the Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti has proved to be one of the best graphics cards ever made for enthusiast gamers – it even earned one of our coveted Best in Class awards. 

With a huge 11GB of GDDR5X memory, 3,584 CUDA cores and a memory clock of 5,505MHz, it remains one of the most powerful GPUs around.

As is usual with GPUs, a number of manufacturers have made their own versions based on Nvidia’s hardware. These often boast additional features, custom designs and improved clock speeds that make small, yet important, differences to the performance of the cards.

So, if you’re serious about fitting out your gaming PC with the best graphics card you can currently buy, read on for our list of the best Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti graphics cards in 2017.

Asus ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

Base clock: 1569 MHz | Turbo clock: 1683 MHz | Memory clock: 11010 MHz | Dimensions: 29.8 x 13.4 x5.25cm | Additional features : OC Mode, Patented Wing-Blade Fan Design with IP5X dust-resistance, ASUS FanConnect II, GPU Tweak II, ASUS Aura Sync

Keeps cool

Looks fantastic

Software can be a bit fiddly

If you’re sticking a powerful graphics card in your PC, then you’ll likely want to shout about it, and the ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 Ti is the perfect choice for people who want to pimp out and show off their rigs thanks to the Aura RGB LED lighting system.

It’s not all about the looks, however, as the Asus ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 Ti also features a design that keeps the GPU cool even when overclocked, while a dust-resistant fan is another nice bonus.

Overall, the Asus ROG Strix GeForce GTX is an excellent package, and the best overall version of the GTX 1080 Ti.

EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 TI FTW3 iCX Hydro Copper

Base clock: 1569 MHz | Turbo clock: 1683 MHz | Memory clock: 11010 MHz | Dimensions: 28.88 x 16.35 cm | Additional features : Hydro Copper waterblock, thermal sensors, EVGA Precision XOC software, adjustable RGB LED

Built-in water cooling

Sleek looks

Waterblock means it can be tricky to install in small cases

Using water cooling to keep your graphics card chilled, and quiet while in use, is very effective – but it’s also risky and complicated. The EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 TI FTW3 iCX Hydro Copper makes things easier, as it comes with the waterblock already installed onto the GPU, so you don’t have to remove and replace any fans. You can then hook it up to an existing cooling solution, or use a pre-built setup. The added complexity and price of the EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 TI FTW3 iCX Hydro Copper makes it suitable for only the most accomplished gamers; however, if you want the ultimate in water-cooled power, it’s a fantastic choice.

MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti GAMING X

Base clock: 1569 MHz | Turbo clock: 1683 MHz | Memory clock: 11124 MHz | Dimensions: 29 x 14 x 5.1 cm | Additional features : Zero Frozr technology, Air Flow control, LED control, heat pipes

Very quiet when not under load

OC mode not much of a boost over other 1080 Ti cards

The MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti GAMING X 11G is another GTX 1080 Ti variant that delivers impressive power while running as cool and quiet as possible. To keep it cool, the MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti GAMING X 11G utilises carefully-designed heat pipes that maximise heat transfer, and a lot of thought has gone into the design of the fans, with a steeper curved blade that helps accelerate airflow. It also features MSI’s Zero Frozr technology, which turns off fans when the card isn’t being used under heavy loads. By only using the fans when they’re needed, the MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti GAMING X 11G runs very quiet – although you pay a bit of a price when it comes to graphical grunt, as this card doesn’t run quite as fast as some of the other GTX 1080 Ti cards on this list.

Gigabyte Aorus GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Xtreme Edition

Base clock: 1746 MHz | Turbo clock: 1632 MHz | Memory clock: 11448 MHz | Dimensions: 29.3 x 14.2 x 5.5 cm | Additional features : Windforce cooling system, copper back plate cooling, RGB Rusion lighting, Aorus VR Link

Clever VR feature

Good cooling

Redundant VR Link if you have no interest in virtual reality

Thanks to its power, the GTX 1080 Ti in any form is an excellent graphics card when it comes to virtual reality. However, for VR fans, the Gigabyte Aorus GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Xtreme Edition is the best choice, as it comes with a handy additional front-facing HDMI port that allows you to easily plug in a HTC Vive or Oculus Rift without having to crawl around the back of your PC, while having plenty of ports to display additional footage to connected monitors. It also has some impressive cooling features, including a copper back plate, and the ‘Windforce stack’, which stacks three 100mm fans to help with heat dissipation. This is also one of the fastest 1080 Ti cards in our list.

Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini

The world’s smallest 1080 Ti

Base clock: 1506 MHz | Turbo clock: 1620 MHz | Memory clock: 11010 MHz | Dimensions: 21.1 x 12.5 x 4.1 cm | Additional features : Smallest 1080 Ti, fits mini-ITX chassis, Icestorm cooling, Firestorm software

Small form factor

Same power as bigger 180 Ti cards

Runs hotter than other cards

Louder, too

If you’re looking to build a compact and discrete PC for your living room that will blow traditional games consoles like the Xbox One and PS4 out of the water,  there really is no other choice if you want to harness the power of the 1080 Ti. The Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini is around two inches shorter than many of the other 1080 Ti cards on this list, yet it doesn’t compromise on performance. This means it’s easier to fit the Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini into small form factor PC cases. However, there have been some compromises made to create such a small GPU. Specifically, because of the small size, Zotac hasn’t employed as advanced cooling solutions as on other GPUs, so the Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini runs hotter than other cards. Because of this the fans will kick in more often, and as they’re smaller they produce more noise. Still, if size and power are all that matter, the Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini is an excellent choice.

NVIDIA Brings Back Destiny 2 Bundle for GeForce GTX 1080 & 1080 Ti Cards

From today to September 5th (or while supplies last), NVIDIA is bringing back June’s Destiny 2 bundle for GTX 1080 and 1080 Ti cards, systems, and laptops, a week ahead of Destiny 2’s PC Beta launch on August 28th. As a reminder, eligible systems include NVIDIA’s own GeForce GTX Battlebox products. The bundle includes Destiny 2 at its October 24th launch date, as well as three in-game items: the Coldheart Exotic Rifle, Kill Tracker Ghost, and Salute emote. These items may also be redeemed by people who purchased the bundle in June.

The upcoming massively multiplayer online sci-fi first-person shooter, a concept Bungie previously described as a “shared world shooter”, will be preceded by an August 24th NVIDIA Game Ready driver. Additionally, Destiny 2 will support High Dynamic Range (HDR) and SLI, a result of NVIDIA’s collaboration with Activision and Bungie. HDR itself will available to test during the PC Beta.

This latest iteration of the bundle does not mention Early Access codes for the PC Beta, although Bungie does state that Destiny 2 preorders through the Blizzard store come with Early Access. In context, Destiny 2 has an exclusive Early Access PC Beta on August 28th, with the general Open Beta running from the 29th to 31st. In any case, NVIDIA is also giving away Early Access codes in celebration of Gamescom, and will announce winners through GeForce Experience on August 25th.

As of August 2017, this is the only active NVIDIA promotional bundle. As before, Destiny 2 game codes may only be redeemed until 30 days after PC launch date.

Codes must be redeemed through GeForce Experience (3.2.2 or higher). After redeeming through GeForce Experience, Destiny 2 must be subsequently redeemed with a Blizzard account. Be sure to verify the participation of any vendors purchased from as NVIDIA likely will not give codes for purchases made from sellers that are not participating.

GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, 32 GB of RAM, NVMe SSD

Corsair on Thursday upgraded its Corsair ONE small form-factor gaming PCs, giving the systems a solid mid-generation upgrade. Relative to the original Corsair ONE, the new Corsair ONE desktops feature more powerful NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti graphics cards, up to 32 GB of DDR4-2400 memory, and NVMe SSDs paired with mechanical HDDs. Meanwhile, pricing of the new systems will be higher compared to that of predecessors with top-of-the-range model available for $2899.99.

Corsair launched its SFF gaming PC this March, a bit later than many other producers of gaming hardware in this generation. To address a high end segment of the market and quickly gain market share, Corsair used everything it had up its sleeve into the Corsair ONE design, including its expertise in building computer cases with good ventilation, SFF PSUs, and custom liquid cooling. The use of an LCS and a properly vented PC case enabled Corsair to integrate rather powerful components inside: up to Intel’s Core i7-7700K as well as NVIDIA’s GeForce GTX 1080, with everything being overclocking-capable. Several months after the company began sales of its ONE-series desktops, the company is adding more powerful hardware options targeting an even higher-end segment of the market. The move puts Corsair’s ONE into the same category with boutique-built PCs, which is where some of Corsair’s rivals did not want to go.

Up until recently, Corsair offered three models of the Corsair ONE priced between $1799.99 and $2399.99 (the more powerful models were branded ONE PRO). The two new Corsair ONE PRO models come with Intel’s Core i7-7700K, NVIDIA’s GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (made by Corsair’s partner MSI and running at up to 100 MHz higher when compared to NVIDIA’s reference design), Corsair’s 480 GB NVMe SSD (previously Corsair’s ONE came with only SATA drives), as well as a 500 W 80 Plus Gold PSU. The new ONE PRO versions are are available for $2699.99 (with 16 GB of DDR4) and $2899.99 (with 32 GB of Vengeance LPX DRAM). Meanwhile, the Corsair ONE PRO priced at $2299.99 also got an SSD upgrade: it now comes with an NVMe drive.

Corsair ONE PC Specifications
Model ONE ONE PRO
CPU Core i7 7700 Core i7 7700K with liquid cooling
GPU GeForce GTX 1070 GeForce GTX 1080 w/LCS GeForce GTX 1080 Ti /w LCS
DRAM 16 GB DDR4-2400 32 GB DDR4-2400
Motherboard mini-ITX, Z270 chipset
Storage SSD 240 GB SATA 480 GB NVMe 480 GB NVMe
HDD 1 TB HDD 2 TB HDD
PSU 400 W 500 W
Warranty 2 years
MSRP $1799.99 $2299.99 $2699.99 $2899.99

From an architecture point of view, the new Corsair ONE PRO models are exactly the same as as their predecessors: they come in the same 12L aluminum chassis with a liquid cooling system featuring two loops, a Mini-ITX motherboard based on Intel’s Z270 PCH, a custom SFX PSU and only one exhaust fan. The only things that have changed are performance and prices. Since all Corsair’s ONE PRO systems use a bunch of standard desktop components, all existing desktops can be upgraded with new SSDs or specially qualified Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 DIMMs.

The new Corsair ONE systems are available in North America, Europe and Australia directly from the company or its partners. The upgrade kits for the existing Corsair ONE PCs will hit the market sometimes later.

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GIGABYTE Announces AORUS GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Waterforce Xtreme Edition 11G and Waterforce WB Xtreme Edition 11G

Following up after last week’s teasers, GIGABYTE has officially announced two ultra-high-end graphics cards under its AORUS brand: the AORUS GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Waterforce Xtreme Edition 11G and the AORUS GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Waterforce WB Xtreme Edition 11G.

Both verbosely-named cards, as the Waterforce branding implies, are liquid-cooling oriented. The standard Waterforce Xtreme Edition is coupled with an all-in-one (AIO) closed loop cooler, while the Waterforce WB Xtreme Edition is outfitted with a full-size water block that can connect to a custom open loop. And so, without pesky fans taking up space, AORUS has dedicated the extra real estate on the card shrouds to a bountiful number of LEDs.

AORUS GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Waterforce Xtreme Editions 11G
  Waterforce Xtreme Edition Waterforce WB Xtreme Edition
Boost Clock 1746MHz (OC Mode)
1721MHz (Gaming Mode)
Base Clock 1632MHz (OC Mode)
1607MHz (Gaming Mode)
Memory Clock 11448MHz (OC Mode)
11232MHz (Gaming Mode)
VRAM 11GB GDDR5X
(352-bit)
TDP Unspecified
Outputs 3x DP1.4, 2x HDMI2.0b (Rear), 1x HDMI2.0b (Front) 1x DL-DVI-D
VR Link VR Mode: 3x DP1.4, 3x HDMI2.0b
VR Link Standard Mode: 3x DP1.4, 1x HDMI2.0b (Rear), 1x DL-DVI-D
Power Connectors 2 x 8pin
Length 267mm
Width 2 Slot (36mm) 2 Slot (28mm)
Height 123mm 149mm
Cooler Type AIO CLC (120mm) Water Block (full-cover)
Price TBA

Generally speaking, both cards only differ in their cooling designs, having the same clocks, 12+2 power phases, and basic features. The 120mm AIO Waterforce Xtreme Edition has a water block that only covers the GPU, with a water block-cooled copper heatpipe and base plate covering the MOSFETs and VRAM. Behind the GPU, the card has a small copper piece embedded in the back plate. In comparison, the Waterforce WB Xtreme Edition has its water block and flow design covering all key components, and has a larger copper slab in the back plate.

Both cards offer the AORUS VR Link design for their display outputs. What this means is that an extra HDMI port is offered on the front (internal) side of the card, while the PCIe bracket has 2 HDMI ports, a DVI-D port, and 3 DisplayPorts. Due to the limited number of display controllers on the GP102 GPU, only 4 ports/displays can be used at one time. In standard mode, a maximum of 4 outputs can be used, selecting from among the first HDMI port, 3 DisplayPorts, and the DVI-D port on the PCIe bracket. In VR Mode, the DVI-D port is not used, and a maximum of 4 outputs can be used from among the 3 DisplayPorts and 3 HDMI ports. Ultimately, the idea is here that the front-facing HDMI can be used for a VR headset, while the rear HDMIs can still be utilized simultaneously for monitors without swapping cables.

As Xtreme Edition cards, the Waterforce and Waterforce WB qualify for an extra year of AORUS Care upon registration within 30 days of purchase, which then adds to AORUS’ standard three-year warranty for four total years. All-in-all, that could mean over 1400 days of guaranteed brightly-lit gaming sessions with RGB Fusion, AORUS’ LED software. For the WB variant, this includes lighting up the water block fittings and the AORUS eagle emblems on both sides of the card, giving the impression that AORUS has simply opted to create a giant rectangular LED that also happens to run games.

GIGABYTE has not announced pricing information at this time. A teaser posted by the official AORUS Twitter states 7/7/17, presumably the availability date for both cards.