OnePlus 5 is mysteriously unavailable to purchase

A sign of things to come?

The OnePlus 5 might not be perfect, but its price-to-specs ratio is undeniably great. With smartphones like the Galaxy Note 8 and Google Pixel 2 XL reaching dangerously close to that $1000 price tag, options like the OnePlus 5 can start to become even more appealing than they were before. Unfortunately, if you were hoping to purchase a OnePlus 5 from OnePlus soon, you won’t be able to do so.

OnePlus has had inventory issues ever since it launched with the OnePlus One back in 2014, whether it be with an irritating invitation system or regularly running out of devices for its customers to purchase. The OnePlus 5 has been out of stock for a number of weeks at this point, and while this on its own wasn’t all that odd, something interesting recently happened.

For at least 24 hours at the time of publishing this article, OnePlus has removed the “buy now” button for the OnePlus 5 from its website. The OnePlus 5 JCC Limited Edition and a link to learn more about it accompanies the site’s home page (a version of the phone that isn’t even available for purchase in North America), and clicking on the OnePlus 5 tab at the top of the site will reveal no option at all to buy the device.

No phone for you!

You can still access the OnePlus 5’s sale page by clicking on the Accessories tab and then the OnePlus 5 header at the top of the page, but doing so will reveal that all models of the phone are out of stock.

At this point, we can think of a couple explanations for OnePlus’s decision to effectively end sales of the OnePlus 5. Either the company is having production issues with the phone and wants to get those worked out before encouraging people to go to the sales page, or it’s already pushing the OnePlus 5 to the curb in anticipating for its follow-up.

A render recently surfaced for what’s supposedly the OnePlus 5T, and it was suggested that the upcoming phone will be made available for purchase in November. We had some issues with the legitimacy of that rumor (and still do), but the timing of it and OnePlus’s recent removal of the OnePlus 5 is interesting to say the least.

What do you think’s going on here? Speculate away in the comments below.

You can buy OnePlus 5 from Croma retail stores from today

OnePlus initially relied on the online sales for its flagship smartphones starting with the OnePlus One. In fact, the company started with the invite basis of sales during its early days.

You can buy OnePlus 5 from Croma retail stores from today

After three successful years of operation in India, it looks like OnePlus is now looking forward to focus on the offline availability. We say so as the company is expanding the presence of its recent flagship – the OnePlus 5. Lately, we came across a teaser put up on the official Twitter handle of OnePlus regarding the availability of the OnePlus 5 via select Croma stores. Starting today, the flagship smartphone will be available offline via the Croma stores in the country in addition to the OnePlus Experience Stores.

OnePlus has teamed up with Croma Retail to expand the availability of the OnePlus 5. Initially, Croma outlets in cities such as Delhi NCR, Mumbai, Bengaluru, Ahmedabad, Pune, and Hyderabad will sell the OnePlus 5.

As an introductory offer, the company is offering freebies to lure the buyers. Those who purchase the OnePlus 5 from Croma will get free Bullets V2 earphones and a flip cover as well. There is good news for the existing OnePlus 5 users as they can get a free flip cover by visiting a Croma Retail store.

Interestingly, the offline price of the OnePlus 5 at the Croma stores is the same as the pricing on Amazon India. The 6GB RAM and 64GB storage variant is priced at Rs. 32,999 and the 8GB RAM and 128GB storage variant is priced at Rs. 37,999 respectively.

It remains unsurprising to see OnePlus starting to focus on the offline availability as several other smartphone brands are looking forward to increase the sales of their smartphones via the retail stores. Given that Oppo and Vivo are into aggressive marketing of their products via the local mobile retailers, OnePlus has to buck up with the offline availability. Even Xiaomi has started focusing on the same by opening Mi Home Stores in the major cities across the country.

OnePlus 6 release date and rumours: What will next year’s OnePlus handset look like?

OnePlus has completely disrupted the market with its series of excellent but affordable smartphones. The recently released OnePlus 5 continues in that tradition – albeit at a higher price than we’ve become accustomed to.

This week, the Chinese company set minds racing by announcing a mystery event in Paris on 19 September: a new collection in collaboration with French designer Jean-Charles de Castelbajac. Could this be something OnePlus 6 related? Almost certainly not. The clever

Almost certainly not. It could plausibly relate to a OnePlus 3T style device – a placeholder between two handsets – but even a OnePlus 5T seems a touch unlikely, given the timeframe that would be involved. The OnePlus 5 only came out in June, after all. It more likely relates to a special edition OnePlus 5, but we can dream.

As you might expect, there’s not much to say about the OnePlus 6 yet. But we’ve got to start somewhere, and at the very least there are some interesting discussion points…

OnePlus 6: Rumours

There aren’t really any rumours yet. The closest we’ve come to one is OnePlus founder Carl Pei asking a Reddit user where they preferred the fingerprint reader. I mean, it’s interesting that he’s open minded on the topic, but it’s hardly the basis of a convincing rumour.

Other than that, we’re expecting the OnePlus 6 to stick with the dual lens camera, given the success of the model on the OnePlus 5. Rumours of a bump to a 2K screen have been doing the rounds for several generations now, and once again they’re in full flow here. In support: most flagship phones hit that level, and if you want a device for VR, it’s a sensible strategy. The case against: it’s more expensive, hits battery and isn’t that helpful for 95% of smartphone use cases.

We think they’re sticking with the headphone jack though. Carl Pei once put the idea to his Twitter followers in an informal poll, and it was roundly defeated.

OnePlus 6: Release date

The OnePlus One launched in April 2014. The OnePlus 2 was July 2015, and the OnePlus 3 appeared in June 2016. The OnePlus 3T bucked the trend with a November 2016 launch, but it was an incremental update, before the OnePlus 5 arrived in June 2017.

With that in mind, June-July 2018 seems pretty likely to us – unless they treat us to a OnePlus 5T.

OnePlus 6: Price

This is where it gets a bit tricky.

The series has undergone some serious price hikes since its debut in 2014, jumping from £229 to £450 in three years.

It could get worse. In a recent Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything), Pei suggested the company could consider making a smartphone that costs over $800 (~£612). “Costs are increasing YoY, we only make flagship products, and we don’t believe in selling products at a loss,” Pei explained.

With these two factors in mind, you’d be foolish to bet on the price dropping below £450 – but it may not go too much higher, as the company clearly still plans to undercut. With that in mind, I’d predict a handset that costs around £500 when it launches – but as ever, we’ll be updating this piece when we know more.

Why OnePlus is Still Succeeding with Developers and Enthusiasts

We all know OnePlus to be a brand that began its journey through controversy. The OnePlus One remained in the limelight not only for its hardware and price tag, but also for all the claims and tactics employed by OnePlus to ensure that the device became one of the most talked about smartphones in enthusiast circles. It was an exercise in viral online marketing, and they arguably succeeded.

 

With the OnePlus 2, they tried to adopt a slightly different approach than what worked with the OnePlus One. While the company doubled down on hyperbole with the “2016 Flagship Killer” moniker, OnePlus did tone down their once socially-controversial marketing tactics, foregoing practices such as “Ladies First” and the thoroughly-hated Invite system. What they also toned down was the developer friendliness of the device, as a few key resources (like sources for the fingerprint sensor and laser autofocus for the camera, and VoLTE support) were not delivered to the community at the times requested. As such, the development scene of the phone could not reach the levels of its predecessor.

After the OnePlus 2 Update Trainwreck, Software Support is Paramount to OnePlus’ Success

The OnePlus X, although a capable product targeting an increasingly forgotten niche (small-screen smartphones), was rather awkwardly placed in market for a fair few reasons: some related to its smaller screen size and hence subsequent demand, and some related to the average-at-best hardware… ultimately the phone could never take off.

And then came the OnePlus 3. The actual 2016 flagship (pre-3T) fixed a lot of wrongs with the OnePlus 2. Combined with the best SoC from Qualcomm in the form of the Snapdragon 820, the OnePlus 3 was better suited for the flagship killer moniker based on its commendable performance. The phone could stand up against several flagships in terms of overall hardware, some hovering at twice the price, and still come out ahead. There were a few drawbacks with the device, like an average camera experience, but such issues could be overlooked when considering the phone’s price and rest of the hardware and software experience, as well as genuinely useful features like Dash Charge or the alert slider.

Suggested reading: Dissecting Performance: What Makes the OnePlus 3 & 3T Excellent Real-World Performers

Something OnePlus also improved on the OnePlus 3 was its developer responsiveness, communication and strategy. The company was perhaps fearing repeating the mistakes they had made with the OnePlus 2, and seeing how the community collectively hated OnePlus’s attitude towards the device, they turned over a new leaf. The company started off on the right foot by dismantling the criticized invite-system for the device for good. This was followed up by a very quick release of the kernel sources and device tree for the device — mere hours after the launch of the phone. We even saw one of the quickest CyanogenMod (unofficial) releases ever. Developers did note that one key feature and major selling point was missing from the sources: Dash Charging. OnePlus promised that this would reach developers eventually, and followed up on the promise by releasing the Dash Charging kernel code and proprietary binaries in about six weeks of the phone’s release. We still have not achieved resolution when it comes to the issue related to camera quality on custom ROMs, though that’s not really the fault of OnePlus due to the fact that open sourcing the camera HAL is not be as easy as Carl Pei originally thought. Either way, OnePlus did go out of its way to help developers by setting up communication channels with them, and in some cases handing out units to them as well.

Roughly a year ago, OnePlus also announced a key change with how it handled software and updates. OnePlus was looking at merging its Chinese software UX, HydrogenOS with its global software UX, OxygenOS. The primary purpose of this merger was to combine both the teams onto the same roadmap and provide quicker software updates to all users, irrespective of region. Originally, people questioned how this change would shape up the new OxygenOS experience, as HydrogenOS tended to lean towards a brighter and more customized UX, one that was likely appreciated by users in China but was not liked as much in the global market given it was quite removed from Stock Android. However, as we have witnessed so far, a lot of the changes in OxygenOS over the year have been unanimously accepted by the users. Some changes, like the Alert Slider changes do continue to infuriate some users. But for the most part, the response to OxygenOS has been positive as it balances itself between customizations and a close to stock Android feel (as opposed to HydrogenOS, a direction that could have been taken by OnePlus).

The major highlight of OxygenOS from an enthusiast’s perspective is the division of updates between the Stable branch and the Open Beta branch (previously known as Community builds). Such a division clearly divided the needs of the enthusiast community from that of the average consumer, allowing OnePlus to serve the needs of both without alienating the other. An average consumer is a lot less accommodating towards bugs and would gladly wait for a polished product instead of something that could break during daily use. An enthusiast on the other hand, often trades that expectation of stability for a chance to try out the latest developmental and experimental features right now and provides feedback to help shape the future of such features.

The Open Beta essentially serves as a very long soak test. Most other OEMs resort to private soak testing before beginning staged rollouts, and then sometimes end up pausing such rollouts when unforeseen bugs appear. Adopting the Open Beta approach allows OnePlus to secure a wider tester audience, a wider timeframe and wider use cases to test and polish updates before beginning their rollouts in the stable channel. And, unlike traditional soak tests, they actually make it an effort to continuously add new features.

The Open Betas themselves have become very popular within the enthusiast community. Despite not being considered as stable themselves, the builds are usually fine for general usage and are good candidates for daily drivers for people who do not mind an occasional bug. Over the year, and as far as the OnePlus 3 and OnePlus 3T are concerned, OxygenOS Open Betas have played testing ground to features like expanded screenshots, data firewall and data saver, gaming do not disturb mode, automatic night mode, EIS and camera quality improvements, ambient display and lift up display, app locker, parallel apps and much, much more. As a consequence though, there is a significant time lag in these features appearing in Open Betas to them appearing in the Stable release, even after they have been seemingly perfected.

With the launch of the OnePlus 3T, some were concerned that OnePlus would be ignoring the OnePlus 3 to favor the newer device. These were fueled by OnePlus’ decision to entirely discontinue the sales of the OnePlus 3 after existing stock depletion despite the device being just about half a year old. But as they promised, software support for the OnePlus 3 continued alongside the OnePlus 3T. With the merging of OxygenOS for both the devices into a single unified build, both devices have essentially become the same phone as far as software is concerned. The unified build approach was also adopted by the custom ROM development community and most major works present in our forums provide a single set of modifications to be applied irrespective of the specific phone (3 or 3T), with certain packages discerning how to apply specific changes upon flashing. So while many people would still consider a half yearly upgrade controversial and largely unnecessary, myself included, it did have an impact in how the developer community shaped around these two devices. A refresh may have just prolonged the scope of the OnePlus 3 by convincing more people to purchase a OnePlus 3T, in turn increasing the combined user base.

OnePlus’s rediscovered willingness to aid developers thankfully did not stop at the OnePlus 3/3T, even though they had a few setbacks as they haven’t always complied with the GPLv2 in time. When the OnePlus 5 arrived, it came along with the device tree and kernel sources needed to kickstart development activities right at the get-go. The phone followed it up with several OxygenOS updates that added in missing features like EIS capabilities on 4K video as well as several bugfixes. The OnePlus 5 does not have an Open Beta program just yet, but this will change once the OnePlus 3/3T are updated to Android Oreo.


What happens to the OnePlus 3 and 3T after Oreo?

Sadly, it is too early to say what happens when OnePlus brings over Oreo to the 3/3T. Android 8.0 will be the final major version update for this set of devices from OnePlus, so the phones will very likely need to rely on the community to help it tide over the rest of its years. That is not to say that the OnePlus 3/3T will not receive any updates beyond Oreo as OnePlus’s statement does leave open the possibility of smaller, minor updates.

And the Oreo update just seems to be right around the corner. The OnePlus 3 Closed Beta group has already received its first taste of Android Oreo, and the company aims to deliver an Oreo build to the Open Beta channels by the end of September for the OnePlus 3/3T as well as the OnePlus 5. For a change, OnePlus is not mentioning any deadlines for delivering Oreo in the stable channels, preferring to just act quick and hopefully let their actions speak for themselves.

What we would like to point out with this article is that OnePlus as a company does appear to have evolved into a more mature entity, one that realizes that fulfilling promises matters, and that actions can speak louder than words. The OnePlus 2 was criticized heavily for being a classic case of overpromising, compromising and under delivering, but the past year with the OnePlus 3, OnePlus 3T and now with the OnePlus 5, the situation does appear changed.

That is not to say that OnePlus is without faults, nor is it to say that their current products are free from any issues. In fact, we at XDA-Developers have been the first ones to break controversial articles highlighting several shortcomings. We criticized the OnePlus 3 and its aggressive RAM management and inaccurate display calibration in the Reviewer software builds; to which OnePlus had to respond with a Reviewer OTA that fixed these issues. We revealed upon the OnePlus 5 launch how OnePlus was manipulating benchmarks to maximize scores; to which OnePlus responded with statements that mentioned that these were intended to showcase the peak potential of the device, and that such performance is “natural” (we disagree) as well as sustainable and does no harm to the device as there is no overclocking involved. The OnePlus 5 inverted display issue which caused jelly scrolling was also documented and confirmed by us;  to which OnePlus responded that the visual effect is “natural” and there exists no variance in screens between devices. We’ve also covered the 911-reboot bug on the OnePlus 5; OnePlus responded with a quick hotfix OTA update as well as followed it up by explaining the cause of the bug and mentioning that they worked with Qualcomm directly to fix the issue (which was reportedly present on phones from other OEMs as well).

The frequency and timeliness of the responses to these “controversies” is what differentiates the OnePlus of 2015 from the company post-OnePlus 2; even if the responses may not be what we would have liked them to be. Overall, their public relations team has seemingly done a good job at responding to the hiccups the company has had, even if they lost a few fans along the way. The community still has a few complaints carried over from the OnePlus 2 and OnePlus X as well, like how the Marshmallow update for the X was delayed for far too long; and how OnePlus backtracked on their own promise to deliver Nougat to their 2016 flagship killer after keeping owners in the dark for several months.

But beyond that, it’s fair to say that the OnePlus 3 marked the company’s coming of age as an OEM. And as members of a website that focuses on software modifications, it’s refreshing to see that their flagships have at least partially filled in the void left behind by the demise of the Nexus program. All of OnePlus’ devices have already received unofficial Android 8.0 Oreo builds:

So it’s not too difficult to see why OnePlus continues to remain a popular choice in our forums, and why it’s becoming increasingly popular among mainstream consumers in several markets as well (for different reasons). Their ability to respond to their vocal community definitely had a hand in their recent successes, or at the very least, minimizing their recent missteps (and there have been many).


 

Change the Splash Screen of OnePlus Devices with SplashInjector

There are many ways to customize your device such as icon packs, third-party launchers, and themes. If you are rooted, you can also change the boot animation, which is the often colorful logo that appears before Android boots up. But there’s also the splash screen, which is the very first thing that shows on your device before the boot animation. It lasts only a few seconds and usually just shows the manufacturer’s name. Customizing the splash screen is usually more difficult than changing the boot animation or anything else, but thanks to a new tool for OnePlus devices, it’ll be really easy to change splash screens.

XDA Senior Member bobglaus created “SplashInjector,” a basic command line interface tool based on the Splash Screen Image Injector created last year by XDA Senior Member makers_mark. The tool supports all OnePlus devices except the OnePlus X (meaning the OnePlus One, OnePlus 2, OnePlus 3, OnePlus 3T, and OnePlus 5) and it has been developed in order to make modifications to the boot splash screen easy and painless for an extra touch of customization.

The developer states that the tool is a bit “hacky” with support for Unix-based systems primarily. Support for Windows arrived in version 1.52, however, the tool loses the ability to package files on the respective OS. Developers can use tools such as Android Flashable Zip Creator in order to make-up for the lost ability. The tool (in its current state) can successfully decode and encode all the “logo.bin” files for every OnePlus device supported. It has the added ability to pack flashable zips automatically.

All that’s needed to be done is a quick run of the “decode” command followed by preference-driven edits to the files in the output folder. The “encode” command will pack everything back up. In order to create a package out of all of the above, the “package”command is essential. Usage instructions have been conveniently hosted at GitHub right here.


Change Splash Screens with SplashInjector

OnePlus 5, OnePlus 3T Available With Discounts, Cashbacks, Offers in OnePlus 1000 Days Sale

As reported earlier, OnePlus on Tuesday commenced its three-day sale celebrating 1,000 days of operation in India. The three-day OnePlus 1,000 Days sale will end on Thursday, September 7, and it offers discounts and deals on the OnePlus 3T and OnePlus 5 smartphones. The offers are only available on Amazon India.

In the sale period, the OnePlus 3T 64GB smartphone has been made available at a discounted rate of Rs. 25,999, giving it a price cut of Rs. 4,000 temporarily. The smartphone is up for grabs at this discounted rate on Amazon India. Furthermore, users can also get additional cashback of Rs. 2,000 on Axis Bank credit and debit cards along with extra Rs. 2,000 off on exchange of their old phones as well. This cashback and exchange offer is going to be applicable on both the OnePlus 5 and OnePlus 3T smartphones. The company is offering up to 12 months of zero cost EMI offer on both the smartphones.

While there’s no discount on the OnePlus 5 smartphone, 100 lucky customers can win complimentary domestic flight vouchers from Cleartrip worth up to Rs. 25,000 as well. The full terms and conditions of this offer can be read here. Apart from this, OnePlus 5 buyers get Rs. 500 promotion credit on Kindle eBooks, up to 75GB of free data for Vodafone users along with three months of free subscription of Vodafone Play, Rs. 250 Amazon Pay balance if you stream the Prime Video app, and free 12 months of damage insurance from Servify. The 1,000 Day Sale is only being held on Amazon India, and no such offers have been listed on the company’s online store.

As mentioned, the OnePlus 1,000 Days sale is a commemoration of OnePlus’ momentous stint in the country in such a short span of time. OnePlus began its journey in India in December 2014 by launching its very first smartphone OnePlus One for Rs. 21,999. At that time, due to low inventory costs, OnePlus sold the smartphone through an invite-only model, but has now, over the years, made it to a point where the invite system has disappeared, and its latest smartphones are available via open sale on Amazon, its own online store, and its exclusive experience stores as well.

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China’s OnePlus tests the waters with Android competitor

OnePlus 5’s camera shoots 4K video and there’s a 16MP front facing snapper.
OnePlus 5’s camera shoots 4K video and there’s a 16MP front facing snapper.

For some time, Australia has been targeted by China-branded ­Android phones that offer quality features at half the price of Apple and Samsung. Huawei P10, Oppo R11 and ZTE Axon 7 are examples.

Now OnePlus is in the mix, with the OnePlus 5, which I have been testing. I’ve found it an ­attractive and lightning-fast handset with a great camera.

The 5 is another phone built by enthusiasts who say they can do better than the bigger players.

OnePlus is a Shenzhen-based firm founded in 2013 by two enthusiastic former staffers at Oppo, a competing China phone maker. They are Carl Pei and current ­OnePlus chief executive Pete Lau, a hardware engineer who was vice-president at Oppo.

Since 2013, OnePlus has released six Android smartphones but the OnePlus 5 is the first to be officially available here — sort of officially as OnePlus has no staff or infrastructure in Australia and you buy it online, but they have a web page specifically for Australian purchasers.

Incidentally, the previous ­OnePlus was the OnePlus 3T: there was no OnePlus 4 because of tetra­phobia, the fear of the number four as in some Asian languages the word for four sounds like the word for “death’’.

OnePlus’s main markets are spread around. In 2014, its first year of sales, it sold more than one million OnePlus One phones in the US, the EU, and China, and late that year targeted the huge Indian market through Amazon.

It has teams in London, San Francisco and Bangalore. The main workforce is in China.

As far as Australia goes, this is a new brand. There were some grey market sales of OnePlus phones here a few years ago, but nothing official.

So why Australia now? A spokesman said it was to test the waters. “This is our first foray, we’re kind of seeing what’s needed. If we decide to build out further in Australia, we’ll see about staff.”

The fact OnePlus hasn’t a physical presence here impacts two ways: first, customer support is offshore. “We’ve been very open on that,” he said.

Second, the spokesman said the 5 doesn’t support band 28 here, which Telstra uses for its faster 4gx network. So you’ll be switched to 4G and 3G instead.

The spokesman said OnePlus hadn’t officially sought carrier ­accreditation for the 5, which is another reason the phone is sold only online. Nevertheless, there is considerable interest in OnePlus phones coming to Australia. Sales of the 5 will decide whether ­another model sells here.

The 5, with an attractive metal body and rounded corners, is stylish. Like several China contenders, it is iPhone-like in looks, although a tad shorter and thinner than iPhone 7 Plus.

It has the same sized 5.5-inch screen, but it’s a better AMOLED display than an IPS LCD. Like the 7 Plus it has a 1080p HD resolution rather than higher quad HD and the same 401 pixels per inch density.

It feels really quick, no doubt because of its fast and modern 8-core Snapdragon 835 processor. Four cores run at 2.45 GHz, which is very fast. My handset scored 181,426 on the AnTuTu benchmark. It has achieved No 1 in ­AnTuTu’s ratings.

The Android operating system on the 5 feels vanilla: the ­unchanged Google version, but OnePlus slightly tweaks it with its Oxygen OS. The current Oxygen version is 4.5.5, overplayed on ­Android Nougat 7.1.1.

The fingerprint sensor, thankfully, is on the front and is lightning fast. There’s a dedicated app tray. You swipe up the menu display as you do on Samsung’s S8. It’s easy to sort and organise your apps.

This model is not water and dust resistant. And there’s no ­microSD card support on the 5 so you are restricted to internal storage. Instead, the card tray supports two SIM cards. It’s a common configuration on phones in Asia but not often enacted here. You could have, say, a Telstra SIM for maximal phone coverage in the bush, but also install a cheap data-only SIM for 4G in the cities. Or two phone SIMS, one for work and one for personal use. You can switch between SIMS.

I particularly liked the back-facing camera on the 5. The phone has two back-facing lenses. One is a standard 16 megapixel lens with a wide f/1.7 aperture, the other a 20MP telephoto lens with 1.6 optical zoom. They combined to take some great shots. Images are sharp, colour bright but not oversaturated, and I took decent panorama photos zooming in.

The OnePlus camera doesn’t offer lots of options but it does have a portrait mode that blurs the background. It’s pretty restricted in terms of what other phones offer: you can’t retrospectively alter the degree of blurring, for ­example.

The camera shoots 4K video and there’s a 16MP front-facing snapper.

I had no trouble getting through the day with the phone’s big 3300 milliampere hour battery, which survived more than 13 hours playing video at 50 per cent resolution.

So how does it compare to, say, Oppo’s new R11? They’re similarly specced phones and look ­almost identical. But with the 5 you get a faster phone and GPU, more internal memory — up to 8GB instead of 4GB, and a slightly bigger battery (3300 v 3000 mAh). It uses a USB-C connector instead of microUSB 2.0. It feels more up to date.

I like the 5’s less customised version of Android Nougat with the app drawer.

The R11 does, however, offer microSD card support, which may sway some consumers. Both phones have proprietary fast charging: OnePlus’s Dash charge as against Oppo’s VOOC flash system.

Overall, the 5 is a phone that I could happily keep using after this review. That’s the best accolade I can give it.

It comes in three colours: slate grey, midnight black, and a white fronted phone with soft gold on the rear (64GB model only). It costs $599 with 64GB of storage and 6GB of RAM, or $699 for 128GB of storage and 8GB of RAM. You get a free case.

It’s available via www.oneplus.net/au.


Unofficial Android 8.0 Oreo Experimental Build Arrives on the OnePlus One

The OnePlus One will always be remembered as controversy’s love child; the device that pushed OnePlus into the headlines for quite a few reasons and not all of them were positive either. But despite all the questionable tactics of the past, there is no denying that the One was a legendary device. Because of its fairly open hardware, its $299 starting price in 2014 and some beastly specifications that punched above the price at the time, the OnePlus One quickly became an enthusiast’s choice when looking for a device with great value.

It’s Settled: The OnePlus One has Stood the Test of Time

Just as we have predicted time and time again, the OnePlus One continues to be a flashaholic’s best friend multiple years later, and has received its first builds of unofficial AOSP based on Android 8.0 Oreo. This experimental build comes to us courtesy of XDA Senior Member  and team, and offers users of the aged device a chance to try out the latest Android version available right now.

The working feature list for the ROM includes key functionality like WiFi, Bluetooth, RIL, audio and video playback, NFC and more. But because of its early and experimental nature, a few key aspects like the camera and camcorder are disabled while others like the graphics and 3D rendering are considered a work-in-progress. There’s also an issue with AOSP and its support for hardware navigation keys, because of which both the on-screen navigation bar and the hardware keys are enabled.

The ROM is fairly stable for an early build, but many would agree that it is not exactly something one would recommend using as a daily driver on the OnePlus One/bacon in its current state. That however, does not take away from the fact that you can enjoy the sweetest Android dessert right now on the flagship killer of 2014.


Do you still use the OnePlus One as your daily driver? Have you tried out Android Oreo on your OnePlus One? Let us know in the comments below!

Unofficial AOSP Oreo Builds for the OnePlus One

OnePlus offers discounts on Oneplus 3T, 5 smartphones to celebrate 1,000 days in India, Telecom News, ET Telecom

NEW DELHI: OnePlus today announced the successful completion of 1,000 days of its operations in India. To celebrate the milestone with its users, OnePlus has announced a special promotion event ‘OnePlus 1,000 Days’.

During the ‘OnePlus 1,000 Days’ sale, the company’s flagship devices OnePlus 3T will be available at a special price of Rs. 25,999 against the regular price of Rs. 29,999. The promotion offer will be rolled out on the 5th of September 2017 and continue till the 7th September 2017.

During the three day promotion period, customers can also avail additional cashback offer of Rs. 2,000 on Axis bank credit and debit cards along with other attractive offers including Rs. 2,000 on exchange of their old phone on both the OnePlus 3T and OnePlus 5. In addition, customers can avail up to 12 months of zero cost EMI offer and 100 lucky customers can win complimentary domestic flight vouchers from Cleartrip.

Speaking on the occasion, Vikas Agarwal, General Manager, India at OnePlus, said, “We are pleased to offer exclusive benefits to celebrate the 1,000 days of OnePlus in India. The fast growth of the brand in India is attributed to the strong support from OnePlus community who truly resonate with the spirit of ‘Never Settle’ and our exclusive sales partner Amazon.in. Since our inception, we have been on a journey to develop premium flagship phones that combines fast, high end hardware with equally high end design. Our journey has just begun, the best is yet to come.”

What started out as a simple idea: to provide the world with the best Android Flagship, has come a long way since then. Today, OnePlus is successfully positioned as a customer first and innovative player in the premium smartphone segment. As per the recent IDC Q2 2017 market report, OnePlus has a market share of 14 percent in the premium smartphone segment (USD 400 and above).

The OnePlus journey in India began with the launch of our very first flagship OnePlus One that disrupted the smartphone industry with its unique system adaptation abilities. The brand continued to disrupt the industry with its own operating system Oxygen OS on the OnePlus 2 and OnePlus X. The company’s motto of ‘never settle’ was further enforced with the launch of its fourth model, the OnePlus 3, a phone that introduced the fastest and safest battery charging technology (Dash Charge).

The OnePlus 3T, its successor, improved the brand’s offering with greater features and propelled it to the top three premium smartphones by the end of the year. The OnePlus 5, launched in June this year, represents the pinnacle of OnePlus’ desire to provide its users with the best possible user experience with the highest resolution Dual Camera set-up and unmatched performance with up to 8GB of RAM coupled with world’s fastest processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 and its proprietary Dash Charge technology.

OnePlus celebrates 1,000 days in India

New Delhi [India], Aug 31 (-NewsVoir): OnePlus today announced the successful completion of 1,000 days of its operations in India. To celebrate the milestone with its users, OnePlus has announced a special promotion event ‘OnePlus 1,000 Days’.

During the ‘OnePlus 1,000 Days’ sale, the company’s flagship devices OnePlus 3T will be available at a special price of Rs. 25,999 against the regular price of Rs. 29,999. The promotion offer will be rolled out on the 5th of September 2017 and continue till the 7th September 2017.

During the three day promotion period, customers can also avail additional cashback offer of Rs. 2,000 on Axis bank credit and debit cards along with other attractive offers including Rs. 2,000 on exchange of their old phone on both the OnePlus 3T and OnePlus 5. In addition, customers can avail up to 12 months of zero cost EMI offer and 100 lucky customers can win complimentary domestic flight vouchers from Cleartrip.

Speaking on the occasion, Vikas ?Agarwal, General Manager, India at OnePlus, said, “We are pleased to offer exclusive benefits to celebrate the 1,000 days of OnePlus in India. The fast growth of the brand in India is attributed to the strong support from OnePlus community who truly resonate with the spirit of ‘Never Settle’ and our exclusive sales partner Amazon.in. Since our inception, we have been on a journey to develop premium flagship phones that combines fast, high end hardware with equally high end design. Our journey has just begun, the best is yet to come.”

What started out as a simple idea: to provide the world with the best Android Flagship, has come a long way since then. Today, OnePlus is successfully positioned as a customer first and innovative player in the premium smartphone segment. As per the recent IDC Q2 2017 market report, OnePlus has a market share of 14 percent in the premium smartphone segment (USD 400 and above).

The OnePlus journey in India began with the launch of our very first flagship OnePlus One that disrupted the smartphone industry with its unique system adaptation abilities. The brand continued to disrupt the industry with its own operating system Oxygen OS on the OnePlus 2 and OnePlus X. The company’s motto of ‘never settle’ was further enforced with the launch of its fourth model, the OnePlus 3, a phone that introduced the fastest and safest battery charging technology (Dash Charge).

The OnePlus 3T, its successor, improved the brand’s offering with greater features and propelled it to the top three premium smartphones by the end of the year. The OnePlus 5, launched in June this year, represents the pinnacle of OnePlus’ desire to provide its users with the best possible user experience with the highest resolution Dual Camera set-up and unmatched performance with up to 8GB of RAM coupled with world’s fastest processor Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 and its proprietary Dash Charge technology. (-NewsVoir)