NVIDIA Corp. Reportedly Prepping GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — The Motley Fool

In May 2016, graphics chip specialist NVIDIA (NASDAQ:NVDA) began rolling gaming-oriented graphics processors based on its then-new Pascal architecture. The first products out of the chute were the GeForce GTX 1070 and its more powerful sibling, the GeForce GTX 1080, targeted at the high-end of the personal computer gaming market.

These processors were notable because they delivered substantial improvements in performance and power efficiency over their predecessors, thanks to the use of a new manufacturing technology, as well as significant design work on NVIDIA’s part. 

Since then, NVIDIA has released additional gaming products based on its Pascal architecture, including lower-power, lower-cost GPUs like the GeForce GTX 1060 and GeForce GTX 1050, and higher-end offerings like the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and the brawny Titan Xp for gamers willing to spend big bucks for the best possible performance.

The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti.

Image source: NVIDIA.

GPUs based on the Pascal architecture have been hugely successful for NVIDIA, helping to power significant growth in both the company’s gaming business and its booming data center accelerator business.

Per rumors from MyDrivers and Baidu, spotted by graphics card-oriented news website VideoCardz, NVIDIA is preparing a new Pascal-based graphics processor for the gaming market, to be called the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

Slotting in between the 1070 and 1080

NVIDIA’s MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 is $379 (though good luck finding one at this price, thanks to the cryptocurrency mining boom, which has dramatically increased demand for the GTX 1070, as well as other graphics processors). The GeForce GTX 1080’s MSRP sits $120 higher at $499.

Based on NVIDIA’s traditional naming scheme, the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti should be a higher-end product than the GeForce GTX 1070 but would sit lower than the GeForce GTX 1080 on both pricing and performance.

How might NVIDIA price the 1070 Ti?

I see two possible scenarios with respect to the potential MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — assuming, of course, that it’s real and comes to market.

First, it could simply sit smack-dab in the middle of the GeForce GTX 1070 and GeForce GTX 1080 on the pricing table at around $439. The purpose of a GPU at that price would be to try to upsell potential GeForce GTX 1070 buyers who aren’t quite ready to drop the cash required on the GeForce GTX 1080.

That could work, but the added revenue from those upsells could be offset if some potential GeForce GTX 1080 buyers opted to go down a notch to the new GPU, saving some money with a product that’s “close enough” in performance.

Another possibility — and, frankly, it’s one that I think is more sensible — would be that NVIDIA would drop pricing on the GeForce GTX 1070, then slot in the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti at the about the price point that earlier product previously occupied.

Such a move would have the effect of increasing the performance-per-dollar of some of its offerings, potentially stimulating demand during the holiday season (which, not-so-coincidentally, is when several high-profile PC games are set to launch).

Ashraf Eassa has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends NVIDIA. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

NVIDIA Corp. Reportedly Prepping GeForce GTX 1070 Ti | Business Markets and Stocks News

In May 2016, graphics chip specialist NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) began rolling gaming-oriented graphics processors based on its then-new Pascal architecture. The first products out of the chute were the GeForce GTX 1070 and its more powerful sibling, the GeForce GTX 1080, targeted at the high-end of the personal computer gaming market.

These processors were notable because they delivered substantial improvements in performance and power efficiency over their predecessors, thanks to the use of a new manufacturing technology, as well as significant design work on NVIDIA’s part. 

Since then, NVIDIA has released additional gaming products based on its Pascal architecture, including lower-power, lower-cost GPUs like the GeForce GTX 1060 and GeForce GTX 1050, and higher-end offerings like the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and the brawny Titan Xp for gamers willing to spend big bucks for the best possible performance.

GPUs based on the Pascal architecture have been hugely successful for NVIDIA, helping to power significant growth in both the company’s gaming business and its booming data center accelerator business.

Per rumors from MyDrivers and Baidu, spotted by graphics card-oriented news website VideoCardz, NVIDIA is preparing a new Pascal-based graphics processor for the gaming market, to be called the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

Slotting in between the 1070 and 1080

NVIDIA’s MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 is $379 (though good luck finding one at this price, thanks to the cryptocurrency mining boom, which has dramatically increased demand for the GTX 1070, as well as other graphics processors). The GeForce GTX 1080’s MSRP sits $120 higher at $499.

Based on NVIDIA’s traditional naming scheme, the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti should be a higher-end product than the GeForce GTX 1070 but would sit lower than the GeForce GTX 1080 on both pricing and performance.

How might NVIDIA price the 1070 Ti?

I see two possible scenarios with respect to the potential MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — assuming, of course, that it’s real and comes to market.

First, it could simply sit smack-dab in the middle of the GeForce GTX 1070 and GeForce GTX 1080 on the pricing table at around $439. The purpose of a GPU at that price would be to try to upsell potential GeForce GTX 1070 buyers who aren’t quite ready to drop the cash required on the GeForce GTX 1080.

That could work, but the added revenue from those upsells could be offset if some potential GeForce GTX 1080 buyers opted to go down a notch to the new GPU, saving some money with a product that’s “close enough” in performance.

Another possibility — and, frankly, it’s one that I think is more sensible — would be that NVIDIA would drop pricing on the GeForce GTX 1070, then slot in the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti at the about the price point that earlier product previously occupied.

Such a move would have the effect of increasing the performance-per-dollar of some of its offerings, potentially stimulating demand during the holiday season (which, not-so-coincidentally, is when several high-profile PC games are set to launch).

10 stocks we like better than Nvidia

When investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now… and Nvidia wasn’t one of them! That’s right — they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of September 5, 2017

Ashraf Eassa has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends NVIDIA. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

NVIDIA Corp. Reportedly Prepping GeForce GTX 1070 Ti | Markets-and-stocks

In May 2016, graphics chip specialist NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) began rolling gaming-oriented graphics processors based on its then-new Pascal architecture. The first products out of the chute were the GeForce GTX 1070 and its more powerful sibling, the GeForce GTX 1080, targeted at the high-end of the personal computer gaming market.

These processors were notable because they delivered substantial improvements in performance and power efficiency over their predecessors, thanks to the use of a new manufacturing technology, as well as significant design work on NVIDIA’s part. 

Since then, NVIDIA has released additional gaming products based on its Pascal architecture, including lower-power, lower-cost GPUs like the GeForce GTX 1060 and GeForce GTX 1050, and higher-end offerings like the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and the brawny Titan Xp for gamers willing to spend big bucks for the best possible performance.

GPUs based on the Pascal architecture have been hugely successful for NVIDIA, helping to power significant growth in both the company’s gaming business and its booming data center accelerator business.

Per rumors from MyDrivers and Baidu, spotted by graphics card-oriented news website VideoCardz, NVIDIA is preparing a new Pascal-based graphics processor for the gaming market, to be called the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

Slotting in between the 1070 and 1080

NVIDIA’s MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 is $379 (though good luck finding one at this price, thanks to the cryptocurrency mining boom, which has dramatically increased demand for the GTX 1070, as well as other graphics processors). The GeForce GTX 1080’s MSRP sits $120 higher at $499.

Based on NVIDIA’s traditional naming scheme, the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti should be a higher-end product than the GeForce GTX 1070 but would sit lower than the GeForce GTX 1080 on both pricing and performance.

How might NVIDIA price the 1070 Ti?

I see two possible scenarios with respect to the potential MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — assuming, of course, that it’s real and comes to market.

First, it could simply sit smack-dab in the middle of the GeForce GTX 1070 and GeForce GTX 1080 on the pricing table at around $439. The purpose of a GPU at that price would be to try to upsell potential GeForce GTX 1070 buyers who aren’t quite ready to drop the cash required on the GeForce GTX 1080.

That could work, but the added revenue from those upsells could be offset if some potential GeForce GTX 1080 buyers opted to go down a notch to the new GPU, saving some money with a product that’s “close enough” in performance.

Another possibility — and, frankly, it’s one that I think is more sensible — would be that NVIDIA would drop pricing on the GeForce GTX 1070, then slot in the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti at the about the price point that earlier product previously occupied.

Such a move would have the effect of increasing the performance-per-dollar of some of its offerings, potentially stimulating demand during the holiday season (which, not-so-coincidentally, is when several high-profile PC games are set to launch).

10 stocks we like better than Nvidia

When investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now… and Nvidia wasn’t one of them! That’s right — they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of September 5, 2017

Ashraf Eassa has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends NVIDIA. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Nvidia’s rumoured GTX 1070 Ti is a needless final shot at AMD’s Vega

Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti specs

There are fresh rumours filtering out of forums in Scandinavia and the East that Nvidia are prepping a new Pascal-based hammer to bash that final nail into the AMD Vega coffin. That card is apparently the Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti.

Your graphics card deserves a good screen, so feed it one of the best gaming monitors around to see it blossom.

Now before we get too excited the only source for this is some snap that’s been circulating around the intermawebs appearing to show an Asus rig with a GTX 1070 Ti GPU inside it. That’s it. No one’s been able to confirm whether there is any shred of truth to the rumour or whether it’s just some Asus intern dropping extraneous letters onto their marketing shizzle.

But that hasn’t stopped the rumour getting fleshed out with alleged specifications, touting a GP104 GPU with either 2,048 or 2,304 CUDA cores inside and 8GB of video memory. For reference, the existing GTX 1070 has 1,920 cores and the GTX 1080 has 2,560. The former sounds more likey, as it would otherwise sit far too close to the GTX 1080 for comfort.

Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti

There’s always a chance that this is just evidence of Nvidia getting bored. With the spluttering launch that has been AMD’s RX Vega cards there’s almost no impetus for the GeForce engineers to move any quicker with the new Nvidia Volta GPU architecture. Any new Pascal release would kinda be like kicking a sickly puppy.

The existing Pascal cards are quick, efficient, and available which makes it very difficult for anyone to make a case for buying new AMD graphics silicon. Nvidia’s CEO has gone on record during a recent super-serious investor briefing saying that for the foreseeable future “Pascal is just unbeatable.”

So, the only reason for Nvidia to want to release an updated Pascal chip with the GTX 1070 Ti card is because they’re either bored or determined to stick another brogue into AMD’s bruised ribs. Maybe this is why Radeon Tech Group’s Raja Koduri has decided to take a break from GPU whispering until the start of next year – he knows there’s more punishment on the horizon.

Poor Vega...

The other big question everyone’s asking is where the hell will the GTX 1070 Ti fit into the existing graphics stack? There’s not a lot of clear air between the current GTX 1070 and GTX 1080, either in performance terms or pricing, so dropping a new card in between will surely cannibalise the sales of its older siblings. I guess there’s always the possibility of a price cut for the GTX 1070 to give a little space to the Ti card, but given the current pricing struggles of AMD’s GPUs there’s little need for that.

Whatever the truth of it, however, none of this makes for pleasant reading for AMD’s graphics card fans.

NVIDIA Rumored To Launch Pascal GeForce GTX 1070 Ti Graphics Card

So NVIDIA GeForce has been a silent bunch since the launch of the highly successful GeForce GTX 1080 Ti but rumor is that a new card may possible be in the works. Posted over at Chinese sources and caught by Videocardz, this new card is rumored to be known as the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

NVIDIA Rumored To Launch a Pascal Based GeForce GTX 1070 Ti Graphics Card With 8 GB G5 Memory

First of all, I would like to state that there’s no official confirmation of any sorts regarding this SKU so all of the details are rumors at best. The details allege that NVIDIA is working on what is to be a brand new Pascal graphics card. The card will be known as the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti and feature a Pascal GP104 silicon.

Technically, this card will be similar to the GP104 based GTX 1080 and GTX 1070. The differences will lie in the configuration of the chip itself. It is stated that the GTX 1070 Ti will come with 2304 CUDA Cores and 8 GB of GDDR5 memory along a 256-bit bus interface. Now this looks to be an interesting graphics card as it will be sandwiched in between the GTX 1070 and GTX 1080.

To be honest, that gap isn’t too huge to begin with. Also worth noting is that the GeForce GTX 1080 is retailing for $499 US while the GTX 1070 has an official MSRP of $349 US. The only price point I can think in between them is $399-$449. The former is too close to a GTX 1070 while the latter is close to a GTX 1080. And let’s just not talk about the GTX 1070 custom models which fall in the same price segment.

So maybe we are looking at a price drop on the GTX 1070 to around $299 US and a sudden intro of the GTX 1070 Ti after that. I know it sounds really weird but the only reason this rumor was worth a post was due to a picture a guy took with his mobile showing what seems to be ASUS’s GTX 1070 Ti STRIX OC (8 GB) model. Whether that’s true or not is yet to be confirmed but we will have a word with our sources if they have more details on the card. And no, Volta isn’t coming this year.



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The best Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti graphics cards

Since its launch in March 2017, the Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti has proved to be one of the best graphics cards ever made for enthusiast gamers – it even earned one of our coveted Best in Class awards. 

With a huge 11GB of GDDR5X memory, 3,584 CUDA cores and a memory clock of 5,505MHz, it remains one of the most powerful GPUs around.

As is usual with GPUs, a number of manufacturers have made their own versions based on Nvidia’s hardware. These often boast additional features, custom designs and improved clock speeds that make small, yet important, differences to the performance of the cards.

So, if you’re serious about fitting out your gaming PC with the best graphics card you can currently buy, read on for our list of the best Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti graphics cards in 2017.

Asus ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 Ti

Base clock: 1569 MHz | Turbo clock: 1683 MHz | Memory clock: 11010 MHz | Dimensions: 29.8 x 13.4 x5.25cm | Additional features : OC Mode, Patented Wing-Blade Fan Design with IP5X dust-resistance, ASUS FanConnect II, GPU Tweak II, ASUS Aura Sync

Keeps cool

Looks fantastic

Software can be a bit fiddly

If you’re sticking a powerful graphics card in your PC, then you’ll likely want to shout about it, and the ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 Ti is the perfect choice for people who want to pimp out and show off their rigs thanks to the Aura RGB LED lighting system.

It’s not all about the looks, however, as the Asus ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 Ti also features a design that keeps the GPU cool even when overclocked, while a dust-resistant fan is another nice bonus.

Overall, the Asus ROG Strix GeForce GTX is an excellent package, and the best overall version of the GTX 1080 Ti.

EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 TI FTW3 iCX Hydro Copper

Base clock: 1569 MHz | Turbo clock: 1683 MHz | Memory clock: 11010 MHz | Dimensions: 28.88 x 16.35 cm | Additional features : Hydro Copper waterblock, thermal sensors, EVGA Precision XOC software, adjustable RGB LED

Built-in water cooling

Sleek looks

Waterblock means it can be tricky to install in small cases

Using water cooling to keep your graphics card chilled, and quiet while in use, is very effective – but it’s also risky and complicated. The EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 TI FTW3 iCX Hydro Copper makes things easier, as it comes with the waterblock already installed onto the GPU, so you don’t have to remove and replace any fans. You can then hook it up to an existing cooling solution, or use a pre-built setup. The added complexity and price of the EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 TI FTW3 iCX Hydro Copper makes it suitable for only the most accomplished gamers; however, if you want the ultimate in water-cooled power, it’s a fantastic choice.

MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti GAMING X

Base clock: 1569 MHz | Turbo clock: 1683 MHz | Memory clock: 11124 MHz | Dimensions: 29 x 14 x 5.1 cm | Additional features : Zero Frozr technology, Air Flow control, LED control, heat pipes

Very quiet when not under load

OC mode not much of a boost over other 1080 Ti cards

The MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti GAMING X 11G is another GTX 1080 Ti variant that delivers impressive power while running as cool and quiet as possible. To keep it cool, the MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti GAMING X 11G utilises carefully-designed heat pipes that maximise heat transfer, and a lot of thought has gone into the design of the fans, with a steeper curved blade that helps accelerate airflow. It also features MSI’s Zero Frozr technology, which turns off fans when the card isn’t being used under heavy loads. By only using the fans when they’re needed, the MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti GAMING X 11G runs very quiet – although you pay a bit of a price when it comes to graphical grunt, as this card doesn’t run quite as fast as some of the other GTX 1080 Ti cards on this list.

Gigabyte Aorus GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Xtreme Edition

Base clock: 1746 MHz | Turbo clock: 1632 MHz | Memory clock: 11448 MHz | Dimensions: 29.3 x 14.2 x 5.5 cm | Additional features : Windforce cooling system, copper back plate cooling, RGB Rusion lighting, Aorus VR Link

Clever VR feature

Good cooling

Redundant VR Link if you have no interest in virtual reality

Thanks to its power, the GTX 1080 Ti in any form is an excellent graphics card when it comes to virtual reality. However, for VR fans, the Gigabyte Aorus GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Xtreme Edition is the best choice, as it comes with a handy additional front-facing HDMI port that allows you to easily plug in a HTC Vive or Oculus Rift without having to crawl around the back of your PC, while having plenty of ports to display additional footage to connected monitors. It also has some impressive cooling features, including a copper back plate, and the ‘Windforce stack’, which stacks three 100mm fans to help with heat dissipation. This is also one of the fastest 1080 Ti cards in our list.

Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini

The world’s smallest 1080 Ti

Base clock: 1506 MHz | Turbo clock: 1620 MHz | Memory clock: 11010 MHz | Dimensions: 21.1 x 12.5 x 4.1 cm | Additional features : Smallest 1080 Ti, fits mini-ITX chassis, Icestorm cooling, Firestorm software

Small form factor

Same power as bigger 180 Ti cards

Runs hotter than other cards

Louder, too

If you’re looking to build a compact and discrete PC for your living room that will blow traditional games consoles like the Xbox One and PS4 out of the water,  there really is no other choice if you want to harness the power of the 1080 Ti. The Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini is around two inches shorter than many of the other 1080 Ti cards on this list, yet it doesn’t compromise on performance. This means it’s easier to fit the Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini into small form factor PC cases. However, there have been some compromises made to create such a small GPU. Specifically, because of the small size, Zotac hasn’t employed as advanced cooling solutions as on other GPUs, so the Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini runs hotter than other cards. Because of this the fans will kick in more often, and as they’re smaller they produce more noise. Still, if size and power are all that matter, the Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Mini is an excellent choice.

Attention mini-ITX PC builders: Gigabyte has the world’s smallest Nvidia GTX 1080

Bigger has typically meant better when it comes to graphics cards. But as the success of products like AMD’s R9 Nano or Asus’ Nvidia GTX 970 Mini have shown, there’s a growing demand for powerful graphics cards that don’t require a oversized tower to house them. Until recently, the most powerful card in the smallest package was the Zotac GeForce GTX 1080 Mini, which measures 211mm in length.

Gigabyte has gone one better with the release of the Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1080 Mini ITX 8G, which measures just 169mm in length. That’s a perfect match for mini-ITX motherboards, which top out at around 170mm in width. Many of the new breed of ITX cases, which includes the popular NFC S4 Mini, shrink the total size of the case to console-like dimensions by limiting the length of graphics cards to the length of the motherboard. While Zotac’s GTX 1080 Mini will technically fit in such cases with modification, the Gigabyte GTX 1080 Mini simply slots in place.

Well, sort of. Since the cooling system still has to shift the heat from the GTX 1080’s 180W TDP, Gigabyte has increased the height of the card over standard PCIe height to 131mm. That’s not a problem in most PC cases, but there are some that don’t allow for extra PCIe height, so it’s best to double check before purchase. Other than that little issue, the Gigabyte GTX 1080 Mini is like any other GTX 1080, sporting a single 8-pin power connector, 8GB of GDDR5X memory (factor overclocked to 10010MHz), and plenty of gaming oomph.

As for clock speeds, the card meets the Nvidia reference design, while also featuring an OC mode which adds a small increase in MHz to the base and boost clock, which clock in at 1632MHz and 1771MHz respectively. Keeping the card cool is a semi-passive 90mm fan, which shuts down at idle, a triple heat-pipe cooling solution, and 5+2 power phases. Hopefully, Gigabyte’s cooling solution is enough to prevent the GTX 1080 Mini from throttling, but it has had success with smaller cards in the past in the form of the GTX 1070 Mini ITX and 1060 Mini ITX.

While the Gigabyte GTX 1080 Mini is currently the fastest graphics card you can buy in such a small form factor, AMD did tease a small version of the its RX Vega graphics cards in the form of the Vega Nano. There’s no word on when the Vega Nano will be released, or whether it would be able to top the GTX 1080 in a small form factor given the higher TDP, but it a potential option for those sticking with team red. The Gigabyte GTX 1080 Mini doesn’t yet have a release date or price, but it’s likely to be around £600/$600.

This post originated on Ars Technica UK

Nvidia GTX 1080 vs. AMD RX Vega … micro machines edition

Gigabyte GTX 1080 Mini

We’ve got ourselves a small-off, people! Get ready for the ultimate in mini graphics cards head-to-heads as Gigabyte have taken the wraps off their new GTX 1080 Mini. It’s an overclocked GTX 1080 with a footprint that makes Zotac’s wee effort look positively obese, and AMD’s RX Vega Nano seem like mere pocket calculator stuff.

Read more: the best graphics card to buy right now.

The Zotac GTX 1080 Mini was the smallest version of Nvidia’s Pascal-based powerhouse that I’d seen in the wild, measuring in at just 211mm in length, but Gigabyte’s own GTX 1080 Mini somehow squeezes high-end GPU cooling into a package that stretches to only 169mm. 

Despite having a single 90mm fan attached to the Gigabyte heatsink, the GTX 1080 Mini still has a factory-overclocked setup. The default ‘Gaming Mode’ gives the GP104 chip its standard 1,607MHz/1,733MHz clockspeed configuration, but the ‘OC Mode’ pushes things on a touch further to 1,632MHz/1,771MHz, for its base and boost clocks respectively.

Gigabyte GTX 1080 Mini comparison

Interestingly this version is only using the original GTX 1080’s 10Gbps memory speeds as opposed to the 11Gbps GDDR5X chips that were introduced alongside the speedy VRAM that came with the GTX 1080 Ti when that launched in March. I guess the wee cooler’s not hardcore enough to be able to deal with both an overclocked GPU and the extra heat generated by overclocked memory.

It might seem a little odd for Gigabyte to be releasing a new version of the GTX 1080 when we’re talking about a GPU that’s over a year old now but, given that we’re not going to see anything Nvidia Volta shaped until 2018 and AMD’s RX Vega is struggling to best it, there’s still a lot of life left in the ol’ Pascal dog.

Tim Sweeney's AMD RX Vega Nano

Creating a super-small version is a smart move, too, given that AMD have been teasing their own micro machine variant of their Vega cards, the Radeon RX Vega Nano. So far, AMD have yet to release the Nano – except, of course, to Tim Sweeney – but when it comes to small-form-factor gaming beasts Gigabyte’s more powerful GPU ought to give the red team’s card some serious problems when it comes to gaming.

Gigabyte haven’t revealed a release date, or price, for their GTX 1080 Mini, but I wouldn’t be the least bit surprised to find it launching at the same time as the AMD RX Vega Nano.

GIGABYTE Unveils GeForce GTX 1080 Mini ITX 8G for SFF Builds

GIGABYTE has outed their GeForce GTX 1080 Mini ITX 8G, the newest entrant in the high-performing small form factor graphics space. At only 169mm (6.7in) long, the company’s diminutive offering is now the second mITX NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 card, with the first being the ZOTAC GTX 1080 Mini, announced last December. While the ZOTAC card was described as “the world’s smallest GeForce GTX 1080,” the GIGABYTE GTX 1080 Mini ITX comes in ~40mm shorter, courtesy of its single-fan configuration.

Just fitting in the 17 x 17cm mITX specifications, the GIGABYTE 1080 Mini ITX features a semi-passive 90mm fan (turning off under certain loads/temperatures), triple heat pipe cooling solution, and 5+2 power phases. Despite the size, the card maintains reference clocks under Gaming Mode, with OC Mode pushing the core clocks by a modest ~2%. Powering it all is an 8pin power connector on the top of the card.

Specifications of Selected Graphics Cards for mITX PCs
  GIGABYTE
GeForce GTX 1080
Mini ITX 8G
ZOTAC
GeForce GTX 1080 Mini
  AMD
Radeon R9 Nano
Base Clock 1607MHz (Gaming Mode)
1632MHz (OC Mode)
1620MHz   N/A
Boost Clock 1733MHz (Gaming Mode)
1771MHz (OC Mode)
1759MHz   1000MHz
VRAM Clock / Type 10010MHz GDDR5X 10000MHz GDDR5X   1Gbps HBM1
Capacity 8GB 8GB   4GB
Bus Width 256-bit 256-bit   4096-bit
Power Undisclosed 180W (TDP)   175W (TBP)
Length 169mm 211mm   152mm
Height 131mm 125mm   111mm
Width Dual Slot
(37mm)
Dual Slot   Dual Slot
(37mm)
Power Connectors 1 x 8pin (top) 1 x 8pin (top)   1 x 8pin (front)
Outputs 1 x HDMI 2.0b
3 x DP 1.4
1 x DL-DVI-D
1 x HDMI 2.0b
3 x DP 1.4
1 x DL-DVI-D
  1 x HDMI 1.4
3 x DP 1.2
Process TSMC 16nm TSMC 16nm   TSMC 28nm
Launch Price TBA ?   $649

The dimensions of the GIGABYTE GTX 1080 Mini ITX actually match GIGABYTE’s previous GTX 1070 Mini ITX and 1060 Mini ITX cards, as well as their OC variants. This is in line with mid-range and high-end mITX cards generally bottoming out at ~170mm lengthwise to match the mITX form factor specification, with the exception of the petite 152mm Radeon R9 Nano, a card made even smaller due to the space-saving nature of HBM. This is a non-trivial distinction, as graphics card dimension measurements often do not include the additional length of the PCIe bracket and sometimes delineate length of the PCB rather than the cooling shroud. In any case, the 211mm long ZOTAC GTX 1080 Mini actually extends over mITX motherboards. For SFF enthusiasts, these millimeters matter.

In the meantime, the GIGABYTE GTX 1080 Mini ITX will be the fastest 169mm long card. For the competition, with the R9 Nano no longer in production, the Vega-based Nano has only been teased at SIGGRAPH 2017 so far.

Details on pricing and availability have not been announced at this time.

Dell’s Inspiron 15 7000 gaming laptop gets serious with GTX 1060 and Nvidia Max-Q

Dell’s Inspiron 15 7000 gaming laptop gets serious with GTX 1060 and Nvidia Max-Q | PCWorld<!– –><!–
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Dell’s Inspiron 15 7000 gaming laptop is getting a little more serious this year, graduating to GeForce GTX 1060 discrete graphics and using Nvidia’s Max-Q technology to put more power into (slightly) less space.

The jury’s actually still out on Max-Q—gamers are openly leery of potential compromises. Looking at the main differences between the refreshed line announced Wednesday, however, and the prior generation, you can see how Max-Q is starting to change how laptops are designed.

The Inspiron 15 7000 gaming laptops will begin shipping in September. Prices start at $999 for FHD-based configurations and $1,449 for UHD-based configurations, with these main options: 

CPU:

  • 7th-gen Intel Core i5-7300HQ quad-core with clock speed up to 3.5GHz
  • 7th-gen Intel Core i5-7700HQ quad-core with clock speed up to 3.8GHz

RAM: 4GB to 16GB (maximum 32GB) of 2,400MHz DDR4

Display (non-touch): 

  • FHD (1920×1080) IPS
  • UHD (3840×2160) IPS

Graphics: 

  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050 with 2GB of GDDR5 memory
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050 Ti with 4GB of GDDR5 memory
  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 with Max-Q and 6GB of GDDR5 memory

Battery: 56Whr, 4-cell

Considering how Dell’s prior generation Inspiron impressed us for its bang for buck, the fact that much remains the same here is a good thing. The new lineup does have a higher starting price, but it’s adding fancier options like the 4K display and the GTX 1060 with Max-Q technology, plus a dual-fan cooling system and a fingerprint reader for Windows Hello. (Maybe it also has better FHD display quality—we didn’t much like the last generation’s.)

Meanwhile, it subtracts battery: The prior generation had a larger 74Whr, 6-cell pack compared to the much smaller one on the new models. Max-Q is supposed to help manage power consumption better. Dell promises anywhere from 7 to almost 10 hours of life depending on the configuration (and of course, what you’re doing). This is in line with our test results for the prior model, so the latest generation is potentially giving you the same battery life with less actual battery. There’s also a new quick-charge technology that will replenish the battery to 80-percent capacity within an hour—that’s nice if you’re actually taking this thing anywhere. 

Chances are you won’t take it far, though. Compared to its predecessor the Inspiron 15 7000 gaming laptop is slightly thinner (0.98 inch compared to an even 1 inch before), but heavier: 5.82 pounds and up for a GTX 1050-based model, and 6.28 pounds and up for a GTX-1060-based model. Last year’s version started at 5.76 pounds. 

Note, too, the differences in AC adapter: A 130-watt model for GTX 1050/1050Ti versions, and a 180-watt model for GTX 1060 versions. The larger adapter will be bulkier, of course. 

The Inspiron 15 7000 gaming laptop is just one example of the new wave of Max-Q laptops, joining the Asus ROG Zephyrus and others. In this case, it seems to be taking advantage of the technology to fit more features into the same space rather than go thinner. We don’t know whether it’ll also be quieter. Even with a higher starting price, however, we expect this model will continue to offer a lot of value for gamers. 

dell inspiron 15 7000 gaming laptop blue Dell

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