NVIDIA Corp. Reportedly Prepping GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — The Motley Fool

In May 2016, graphics chip specialist NVIDIA (NASDAQ:NVDA) began rolling gaming-oriented graphics processors based on its then-new Pascal architecture. The first products out of the chute were the GeForce GTX 1070 and its more powerful sibling, the GeForce GTX 1080, targeted at the high-end of the personal computer gaming market.

These processors were notable because they delivered substantial improvements in performance and power efficiency over their predecessors, thanks to the use of a new manufacturing technology, as well as significant design work on NVIDIA’s part. 

Since then, NVIDIA has released additional gaming products based on its Pascal architecture, including lower-power, lower-cost GPUs like the GeForce GTX 1060 and GeForce GTX 1050, and higher-end offerings like the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and the brawny Titan Xp for gamers willing to spend big bucks for the best possible performance.

The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti.

Image source: NVIDIA.

GPUs based on the Pascal architecture have been hugely successful for NVIDIA, helping to power significant growth in both the company’s gaming business and its booming data center accelerator business.

Per rumors from MyDrivers and Baidu, spotted by graphics card-oriented news website VideoCardz, NVIDIA is preparing a new Pascal-based graphics processor for the gaming market, to be called the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

Slotting in between the 1070 and 1080

NVIDIA’s MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 is $379 (though good luck finding one at this price, thanks to the cryptocurrency mining boom, which has dramatically increased demand for the GTX 1070, as well as other graphics processors). The GeForce GTX 1080’s MSRP sits $120 higher at $499.

Based on NVIDIA’s traditional naming scheme, the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti should be a higher-end product than the GeForce GTX 1070 but would sit lower than the GeForce GTX 1080 on both pricing and performance.

How might NVIDIA price the 1070 Ti?

I see two possible scenarios with respect to the potential MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — assuming, of course, that it’s real and comes to market.

First, it could simply sit smack-dab in the middle of the GeForce GTX 1070 and GeForce GTX 1080 on the pricing table at around $439. The purpose of a GPU at that price would be to try to upsell potential GeForce GTX 1070 buyers who aren’t quite ready to drop the cash required on the GeForce GTX 1080.

That could work, but the added revenue from those upsells could be offset if some potential GeForce GTX 1080 buyers opted to go down a notch to the new GPU, saving some money with a product that’s “close enough” in performance.

Another possibility — and, frankly, it’s one that I think is more sensible — would be that NVIDIA would drop pricing on the GeForce GTX 1070, then slot in the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti at the about the price point that earlier product previously occupied.

Such a move would have the effect of increasing the performance-per-dollar of some of its offerings, potentially stimulating demand during the holiday season (which, not-so-coincidentally, is when several high-profile PC games are set to launch).

Ashraf Eassa has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends NVIDIA. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

NVIDIA Corp. Reportedly Prepping GeForce GTX 1070 Ti | Business Markets and Stocks News

In May 2016, graphics chip specialist NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) began rolling gaming-oriented graphics processors based on its then-new Pascal architecture. The first products out of the chute were the GeForce GTX 1070 and its more powerful sibling, the GeForce GTX 1080, targeted at the high-end of the personal computer gaming market.

These processors were notable because they delivered substantial improvements in performance and power efficiency over their predecessors, thanks to the use of a new manufacturing technology, as well as significant design work on NVIDIA’s part. 

Since then, NVIDIA has released additional gaming products based on its Pascal architecture, including lower-power, lower-cost GPUs like the GeForce GTX 1060 and GeForce GTX 1050, and higher-end offerings like the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and the brawny Titan Xp for gamers willing to spend big bucks for the best possible performance.

GPUs based on the Pascal architecture have been hugely successful for NVIDIA, helping to power significant growth in both the company’s gaming business and its booming data center accelerator business.

Per rumors from MyDrivers and Baidu, spotted by graphics card-oriented news website VideoCardz, NVIDIA is preparing a new Pascal-based graphics processor for the gaming market, to be called the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

Slotting in between the 1070 and 1080

NVIDIA’s MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 is $379 (though good luck finding one at this price, thanks to the cryptocurrency mining boom, which has dramatically increased demand for the GTX 1070, as well as other graphics processors). The GeForce GTX 1080’s MSRP sits $120 higher at $499.

Based on NVIDIA’s traditional naming scheme, the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti should be a higher-end product than the GeForce GTX 1070 but would sit lower than the GeForce GTX 1080 on both pricing and performance.

How might NVIDIA price the 1070 Ti?

I see two possible scenarios with respect to the potential MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — assuming, of course, that it’s real and comes to market.

First, it could simply sit smack-dab in the middle of the GeForce GTX 1070 and GeForce GTX 1080 on the pricing table at around $439. The purpose of a GPU at that price would be to try to upsell potential GeForce GTX 1070 buyers who aren’t quite ready to drop the cash required on the GeForce GTX 1080.

That could work, but the added revenue from those upsells could be offset if some potential GeForce GTX 1080 buyers opted to go down a notch to the new GPU, saving some money with a product that’s “close enough” in performance.

Another possibility — and, frankly, it’s one that I think is more sensible — would be that NVIDIA would drop pricing on the GeForce GTX 1070, then slot in the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti at the about the price point that earlier product previously occupied.

Such a move would have the effect of increasing the performance-per-dollar of some of its offerings, potentially stimulating demand during the holiday season (which, not-so-coincidentally, is when several high-profile PC games are set to launch).

10 stocks we like better than Nvidia

When investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now… and Nvidia wasn’t one of them! That’s right — they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of September 5, 2017

Ashraf Eassa has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends NVIDIA. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

NVIDIA Corp. Reportedly Prepping GeForce GTX 1070 Ti | Markets-and-stocks

In May 2016, graphics chip specialist NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) began rolling gaming-oriented graphics processors based on its then-new Pascal architecture. The first products out of the chute were the GeForce GTX 1070 and its more powerful sibling, the GeForce GTX 1080, targeted at the high-end of the personal computer gaming market.

These processors were notable because they delivered substantial improvements in performance and power efficiency over their predecessors, thanks to the use of a new manufacturing technology, as well as significant design work on NVIDIA’s part. 

Since then, NVIDIA has released additional gaming products based on its Pascal architecture, including lower-power, lower-cost GPUs like the GeForce GTX 1060 and GeForce GTX 1050, and higher-end offerings like the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and the brawny Titan Xp for gamers willing to spend big bucks for the best possible performance.

GPUs based on the Pascal architecture have been hugely successful for NVIDIA, helping to power significant growth in both the company’s gaming business and its booming data center accelerator business.

Per rumors from MyDrivers and Baidu, spotted by graphics card-oriented news website VideoCardz, NVIDIA is preparing a new Pascal-based graphics processor for the gaming market, to be called the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

Slotting in between the 1070 and 1080

NVIDIA’s MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 is $379 (though good luck finding one at this price, thanks to the cryptocurrency mining boom, which has dramatically increased demand for the GTX 1070, as well as other graphics processors). The GeForce GTX 1080’s MSRP sits $120 higher at $499.

Based on NVIDIA’s traditional naming scheme, the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti should be a higher-end product than the GeForce GTX 1070 but would sit lower than the GeForce GTX 1080 on both pricing and performance.

How might NVIDIA price the 1070 Ti?

I see two possible scenarios with respect to the potential MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — assuming, of course, that it’s real and comes to market.

First, it could simply sit smack-dab in the middle of the GeForce GTX 1070 and GeForce GTX 1080 on the pricing table at around $439. The purpose of a GPU at that price would be to try to upsell potential GeForce GTX 1070 buyers who aren’t quite ready to drop the cash required on the GeForce GTX 1080.

That could work, but the added revenue from those upsells could be offset if some potential GeForce GTX 1080 buyers opted to go down a notch to the new GPU, saving some money with a product that’s “close enough” in performance.

Another possibility — and, frankly, it’s one that I think is more sensible — would be that NVIDIA would drop pricing on the GeForce GTX 1070, then slot in the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti at the about the price point that earlier product previously occupied.

Such a move would have the effect of increasing the performance-per-dollar of some of its offerings, potentially stimulating demand during the holiday season (which, not-so-coincidentally, is when several high-profile PC games are set to launch).

10 stocks we like better than Nvidia

When investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now… and Nvidia wasn’t one of them! That’s right — they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of September 5, 2017

Ashraf Eassa has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends NVIDIA. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

NVIDIA Rumored To Launch Pascal GeForce GTX 1070 Ti Graphics Card

So NVIDIA GeForce has been a silent bunch since the launch of the highly successful GeForce GTX 1080 Ti but rumor is that a new card may possible be in the works. Posted over at Chinese sources and caught by Videocardz, this new card is rumored to be known as the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

NVIDIA Rumored To Launch a Pascal Based GeForce GTX 1070 Ti Graphics Card With 8 GB G5 Memory

First of all, I would like to state that there’s no official confirmation of any sorts regarding this SKU so all of the details are rumors at best. The details allege that NVIDIA is working on what is to be a brand new Pascal graphics card. The card will be known as the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti and feature a Pascal GP104 silicon.

Technically, this card will be similar to the GP104 based GTX 1080 and GTX 1070. The differences will lie in the configuration of the chip itself. It is stated that the GTX 1070 Ti will come with 2304 CUDA Cores and 8 GB of GDDR5 memory along a 256-bit bus interface. Now this looks to be an interesting graphics card as it will be sandwiched in between the GTX 1070 and GTX 1080.

To be honest, that gap isn’t too huge to begin with. Also worth noting is that the GeForce GTX 1080 is retailing for $499 US while the GTX 1070 has an official MSRP of $349 US. The only price point I can think in between them is $399-$449. The former is too close to a GTX 1070 while the latter is close to a GTX 1080. And let’s just not talk about the GTX 1070 custom models which fall in the same price segment.

So maybe we are looking at a price drop on the GTX 1070 to around $299 US and a sudden intro of the GTX 1070 Ti after that. I know it sounds really weird but the only reason this rumor was worth a post was due to a picture a guy took with his mobile showing what seems to be ASUS’s GTX 1070 Ti STRIX OC (8 GB) model. Whether that’s true or not is yet to be confirmed but we will have a word with our sources if they have more details on the card. And no, Volta isn’t coming this year.



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TinyNvidiaUpdateChecker: update Nvidia drivers without Geforce Experience

TinyNvidiaUpdateChecker is a small open source program for Microsoft Windows devices to update Nvidia drivers without relying on Geforce Experience.

While it is possible to update Nvidia drivers manually by downloading driver packages from the Nvidia website, the only built-in option to update drivers automatically is part of Geforce Experience.

Using Geforce Experience has its advantages, but it comes at a cost. We suggest you customize the installation of Nvidia drivers and only install the drivers you require. This is better for system performance, does away with most Telemetry that may be installed otherwise, and also mitigates security issues.

TinyNvidiaUpdateChecker

tiny nvidia update checker download

TinyNvidiaUpdateChecker is a small program for Windows that checks for driver updates when you run it, downloads updated drivers, and runs the installer. The program depends on the HTML Agility Pack which you can download from the project’s website and place in the same directory as Tiny Nvidia Update Checker. The application attempts to download it otherwise (it is just 130 Kilobytes).

Note that you need to have WinRAR installed on the system to make use of the minimal installer method the program supports. The standard Nvidia setup is launched otherwise with Express selected by default.

NVIDIAs drivers also come with telemetry which this application can remove from the installer, but requries WinRAR in order to extract the self-extracting archive, and will only extract the core GPU drivers. (no Physics, HD Audio, Geforce Experience, 3D drivers, etc).

Windows may display a SmartScreen warning when you run the program. You need to bypass the warning, which I have explained in this guide.

The program opens a command prompt window, and will display several prompts to you. This is a one-time thing only as your answers will be saved so that you don’t need to go through the initial setup again.

Basically, what you do is select the right Nvidia graphics adapter, and decide whether you want to install the driver using minimal installation or not.

The program displays information on the updated driver on the screen if it finds one.

tiny nvidia update checker

You may open the Nvidia driver release PDF using it as well if you want. The release PDF document includes additional information, for instance known issues.

The download happens automatically at this point, and the next step depends on your previous selection. If you selected the minimal installation method and have WinRAR installed, all components but the core GPU driver are removed from the package.

If you have not, the default installation prompt is shown and it is up to you to deselect components that you don’t want installed.

Run the program whenever you want to check for updates. You can automate this by adding it to the system start, or by creating a scheduled task that runs when you want it to run (for instance when the PC is idle).

Closing Words

Tiny Nvidia Update Checker is a handy program for Windows, as you may use it to check for Nvidia graphics card updates, and install them either with minimal components without Telemetry and all that good stuff, or manually if you require some of the components.

Now You: Do you update drivers regularly?

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TinyNvidiaUpdateChecker

Operating System

Windows

Software Category

Administration

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About Martin Brinkmann

Martin Brinkmann is a journalist from Germany who founded Ghacks Technology News Back in 2005. He is passionate about all things tech and knows the Internet and computers like the back of his hand.You can follow Martin on Facebook, Twitter or Google+

GIGABYTE Unveils GeForce GTX 1080 Mini ITX 8G for SFF Builds

GIGABYTE has outed their GeForce GTX 1080 Mini ITX 8G, the newest entrant in the high-performing small form factor graphics space. At only 169mm (6.7in) long, the company’s diminutive offering is now the second mITX NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 card, with the first being the ZOTAC GTX 1080 Mini, announced last December. While the ZOTAC card was described as “the world’s smallest GeForce GTX 1080,” the GIGABYTE GTX 1080 Mini ITX comes in ~40mm shorter, courtesy of its single-fan configuration.

Just fitting in the 17 x 17cm mITX specifications, the GIGABYTE 1080 Mini ITX features a semi-passive 90mm fan (turning off under certain loads/temperatures), triple heat pipe cooling solution, and 5+2 power phases. Despite the size, the card maintains reference clocks under Gaming Mode, with OC Mode pushing the core clocks by a modest ~2%. Powering it all is an 8pin power connector on the top of the card.

Specifications of Selected Graphics Cards for mITX PCs
  GIGABYTE
GeForce GTX 1080
Mini ITX 8G
ZOTAC
GeForce GTX 1080 Mini
  AMD
Radeon R9 Nano
Base Clock 1607MHz (Gaming Mode)
1632MHz (OC Mode)
1620MHz   N/A
Boost Clock 1733MHz (Gaming Mode)
1771MHz (OC Mode)
1759MHz   1000MHz
VRAM Clock / Type 10010MHz GDDR5X 10000MHz GDDR5X   1Gbps HBM1
Capacity 8GB 8GB   4GB
Bus Width 256-bit 256-bit   4096-bit
Power Undisclosed 180W (TDP)   175W (TBP)
Length 169mm 211mm   152mm
Height 131mm 125mm   111mm
Width Dual Slot
(37mm)
Dual Slot   Dual Slot
(37mm)
Power Connectors 1 x 8pin (top) 1 x 8pin (top)   1 x 8pin (front)
Outputs 1 x HDMI 2.0b
3 x DP 1.4
1 x DL-DVI-D
1 x HDMI 2.0b
3 x DP 1.4
1 x DL-DVI-D
  1 x HDMI 1.4
3 x DP 1.2
Process TSMC 16nm TSMC 16nm   TSMC 28nm
Launch Price TBA ?   $649

The dimensions of the GIGABYTE GTX 1080 Mini ITX actually match GIGABYTE’s previous GTX 1070 Mini ITX and 1060 Mini ITX cards, as well as their OC variants. This is in line with mid-range and high-end mITX cards generally bottoming out at ~170mm lengthwise to match the mITX form factor specification, with the exception of the petite 152mm Radeon R9 Nano, a card made even smaller due to the space-saving nature of HBM. This is a non-trivial distinction, as graphics card dimension measurements often do not include the additional length of the PCIe bracket and sometimes delineate length of the PCB rather than the cooling shroud. In any case, the 211mm long ZOTAC GTX 1080 Mini actually extends over mITX motherboards. For SFF enthusiasts, these millimeters matter.

In the meantime, the GIGABYTE GTX 1080 Mini ITX will be the fastest 169mm long card. For the competition, with the R9 Nano no longer in production, the Vega-based Nano has only been teased at SIGGRAPH 2017 so far.

Details on pricing and availability have not been announced at this time.

Nvidia GeForce MX150: New dedicated laptop graphics explained

Nvidia GeForce MX150 – Laptop graphics explained

A whole host of new laptops have been launched at the IFA 2017 trade show in Berlin, and many of them come equipped with Nvidia GeForce MX150 graphics. What is it, how powerful is it and should you care? We take a look.

Nvidia GeForce MX150 – Gaming performance

For many laptop buyers who like gaming, the promise of dedicated or discrete graphics is like a red flag to a bull: it means extra performance in the latest 3D games. The MX150 is a replacement to the GeForce 940MX that has appeared in loads of laptops over the last couple of years. MX150 was first announced in May, but it’s taken until the end of August 2017 to start appearing in laptops we can buy.

It’s also a replacement for any Intel HD (now called UHD) graphics hardware that comes baked into your laptop’s processor. Intel graphics have never been known for their gaming performance, so it’s easy to dismiss nearly every laptop without a discrete GPU as something to avoid.

Related: Best gaming laptops

So far, we’ve not had an MX150 laptop in to test, but Nvidia has provided some its own figures to give you a rough idea of what performance to expect. First and foremost, the MX150 is not a high-end GPU. Nvidia’s marketing material on the MX150 only makes mention of playing eSports games such as Dota 2, CS:GO, LoL and World of Tanks at Full HD resolution at 60fps. The company doesn’t make any claims about what graphical settings you’ll be running, although this point is fairly moot as we’d recommend you let Nvidia GeForce Experience software take over and do the heavy lifting to decide what graphics settings you should be running at.

So, eSports only, then? Maybe, but we can use some other data to see how more advanced games will run.

In our recent review of the HP Spectre x360 15, we ran some benchmarks on the included 940MX GPU. There we saw performance of 50fps in Dirty Rally at Full HD, Medium settings, and 30fps in Shadow of Mordor at Full HD. Nvidia claims the MX150 is 25% more powerful than the 940MX (and 4x more powerful than last-generation Intel HD Graphics 520), so from that we can take away that while this GPU isn’t designed for the latest AAA games, it can technically run them if you dial down graphics settings and/or resolution. Again, if the game is supported by GeForce Experience, Nvidia should automatically be able to set your game up for the best performance/eye-candy compromise.

Nvidia marketing material

The thing you should take into account here is that this GPU will often be found in laptops with relatively low-power 7th- and 8th-generation Intel Core CPUs. These chips will often be a bit of a bottleneck for your games – some more advanced titles such as Battlefield 1 – struggle without a properly beefy processor, no matter how good your GPU is.

Video and photo editing

The MX150 is a dab hand at photo editing in Adobe products, according to Nvidia. The company reckons you’ll be able to crop and remaster photos up to 2.5x faster than bog-standard Intel HD Graphics, and up to 4x faster colour remastering when working with video content.

Nvidia marketing material

Should I buy a GeForce MX150 laptop?

Until we’ve tested one for sure we can’t give a definitive verdict, but we can offer some general advice. GeForce MX150 will probably find itself in thinner and lighter laptops than the full-desktop-style GPUs such as GTX 1050 and 1050 Ti. If you’re really after a gaming laptop, consider a thicker and heavier machine. If you want thin and light and want to play older or eSports titles, these new MX150 should fit the bill. Check back here when we have more on the MX150’s benchmark results.

GeForce GTX 1060 and Thunderbolt 3

This morning at IFA, Dell is taking the wraps off of their updated Inspiron 15 7000 Gaming notebook. The entry-level gaming laptop is receiving a bump in specifications as well as a mid-generation facelift.

The original model, the 7567, was first presented at CES and proved to be a capable gaming laptop for full HD gaming, said to have an above average battery life and came in with aggressive pricing. Meanwhile the model Dell is introducing today, the late-2017 model 7577, is receiving several updates, including a faster graphics card option in the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 6GB, a quick-charge 56 Whr 4-Cell battery, 2×2 802.11ac WiFi, an IPS display in the base configuration, and a Thunderbolt 3 port (USB3.1 Gen2 Type-C port with support for Thunderbolt and DisplayPort). Dell also updated the chassis a bit. The most apparent physical change is the restyled, black, front and rear vents giving the laptop a more high-end aesthetic than the red grills used before.

The GTX 1060 is going to be a welcome addition to the family considering it is supposed to be a gaming laptop. The 1050Ti is a capable card at 1080p, but the GTX 1060 (60W, 10W more than the 1050Ti) will allow for higher framerates and/or higher settings in many titles. The extra performance it provides breathes a bit more life into the mainstream gamer. Though even with the faster GPU, the fact that Dell still offers an optional 4K IPS display on what’s pitched as a gaming notebook is a little odd; the GTX 1060 just doesn’t have enough horsepower to drive that many pixels at high quality settings in many titles.

Surprisingly, Dell has moved to a 56 WHr, 4-Cell quick-charge battery in lieu of the 74WHr 6-Cell battery on the previous version. Given that internal volume and battery capacities are closely linked, it’s not obvious at this second what Dell has installed in place of the additional battery cells. In any case, the company says that the battery lasts up to 7 hours and 3 minutes when equipped with the high-end configuration (i7, GTX 1060, 16GB Memory, UHD screen, SSD + HDD – tested using Mobile Mark 14 battery life). On the other hand, this is a gaming laptop and is generally plugged in using AC Power. The quick-charge battery will go from 0% to 80% charge in 60 minutes. 

Another change to the Inspiron 15 7000 Gaming laptop is the inclusion of multiple radio antennas in the chassis in order to support 2×2 stream WiFi, increasing the laptop’s WiFi speed and range versus the 1×1 solution used in the previous model. Dell also added Thunderbolt 3 connectivity via USB3.1 Gen2 Type-C port. It can support a 5K external display, dual 4K externals displays, or other high-bandwidth Thunderbolt peripherals (external GPU perhaps?).

Meanwhile, Dell has done away with the previous model’s entry-level 1080p TN panel, and instead the laptop’s base configuration now starts with their 1080p IPS Anti-Glare LED-backlit panel. Customization options still include the company’s 1080p IPS Truelife LED-backlit Touch Display, along with a 4K UHD panel that is also IPS Anti-Glare LED-backlit.

7567 Revisited

Most everything else remains the same from the 7567 version. Drive configurations are anything from a single 1TB HDD to 512GB PCIe SSD. Mixed configurations of HDD and SSDs are also an option. System RAM capacity remains the same with options from 4-16GB 2400MHz DDR4; Up to 32GB. Connectivity outside of the Thunderbolt/USB Type-C port also is unchanged with an HDMI2.0 port, 3x USB3.1 Type-A (one with PowerShare), a Noble lock slot, 2-in-1 SD card reader, Gigabit Ethernet, and a 3.5mm headphone/mic port. Even the LED-backlit keyboard has been carried over. Complete Specifications are found in the table below (major changes in bold).

Dell Inspiron 15 7000 Gaming
  7567 (Early 2017) 7577 (Late 2017)
CPU Intel Core i5-7300HQ 4C/4T Up to 3.5 GHz, 6MB Cache, 45W TDP
Intel Core i7-7700HQ 4C/8T Up to 3.5 GHz, 6MB Cache, 45W TDP
GPU NVIDIA GTX 1050 4GB GDDR5
NVIDIA GTX 1050Ti 4GB GDDR5
NVIDA GTX 1050 4GB GDDR5
NVIDIA GTS 1050Ti 4GB GDDR5
NVIDIA GTX 1060 6GB GDDR5
Memory 4-16GB 2400MHz DDR4; Up to 32GB
Display 1920×1080 TN LED Backlit Display  
1920×1080 IPS Anti-Glare LED Backlit Display
1920×1080 IPS Truelife LED Backlit Touch Display
3840×2160 IPS Anti-Glare LED Backlit Display
Storage 1 TB 5400 RPM HDD
1 TB 5400 RPM Hybrid HDD (8GB Cache)
Dual drive config w/ 128GB SSD + 500GB 5400 RPM HDD
Dual drive config w/ 128GB SSD + 1TB 5400 RPM HDD
Dual drive config w/ 256GB SSD + 1TB 5400 RPM HDD
256GB SSD
512GB PCIe SSD
I/O 3 x USB 3.1 Ports
1 x Kensingtonlock Slot
1 x HDMI 2.0
1 x SD Card Slot
1 x Headset/Mic Jack
1 x GbE
3 x USB 3.1 Ports
1 x Noble lock Slot
1 x 3.1 Gen 2 USB Type-C (w/ Thunderbolt 3 support)
1 x HDMI 2.0
1 x SD Card Slot
1 x Headset/Mic Jack
1 x GbE
Dimensions 24.5-25.5mm x 384.9mm x 274.7mm
1″-1.01 x 15.15″ x 10.82″ (HxWxD)
24.95mm x 389mm x 274.7mm 
.98″ x 15.32″ x 10.82″ (HxWxD)
Weight Starting @ 2.65 Kg / 5.84 lbs w/Core i7, UHD IPS non-touch Display, 512GB SSD  Starting @ 2.65 Kg / 5.84 lbs w/GTX 1050, 128GB SSD, FHD non-touch
 Starting @ 2.85 Kg / 6.28 lbs w/GTX 1060, 128GB SSD +1TB HDD, UHD non-touch 
Battery 74 Wh, 6-Cell Battery, 130W AC Adapter Quick-charge 56 Wh 4-Cell Battery, 130W AC Adapter
Wireless/Network 802.11ac + Bluetooth 4.2, Dual Band 2.4 & 5 GHz, 1×1, Gbe 802.11ac + Bluetooth 4.2, Dual Band 2.4 & 5 GHz, 2×2, Gbe
Price $799+ $999+

Dell tells us that the new model will be available in the US on September 12th, with prices starting at $999.

Related Items:

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 3GB vs 6GB review • Eurogamer.net

The 3GB version of Nvidia’s GTX 1060 is a curious product. Is it actually a GTX 1060 at all? The cutbacks made to this product aren’t just memory-based in nature. In addition to chopping down the full-fat product’s memory allocation, we also see a drop in available processing cores. The full complement of 1280 shaders drops to 1152 – and most of the time, this tends to be accompanied by a change in name. GTX 1050 Ti, any one? GTX 1060 LE?

It seems that Nvidia is using its product names now to group its GPUs together in terms of performance as opposed to actual spec. Based on the firm’s claims, the three gig GTX 1060 should offer just a five per cent deficit in performance compared to the same product running the fully enabled GP106 processor. Essentially – in practise, you probably won’t be able to tell the difference.

But it’s the drop in available memory we should be most concerned about. High quality texture modes are on the increase, downloadable ‘HQ’ texture packs are also a thing, not to mention the beginnings of memory hungry hyper-level presets – as seen in Mirror’s Edge Catalyst. Now, generally speaking, based on our experience playing the likes of Gears of War Ultimate Edition, Mirror’s Edge, Rise of the Tomb Raider and Doom 2016, the difference can be quite subtle. But the point is that generally speaking, memory requirements are only moving in one direction and there’s a definite sense that even with its cut-back shader allocation, GTX 1060 3GB doesn’t fully balance its performance with its framebuffer resources.

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 3GB specs

specs

What we’re looking at here is the exact same technology as the full-fat GTX 1060, with a couple of cut-backs – there’s 90 per cent of the full CUDA core count, and obviously the framebuffer memory is halved.

  • CUDA Cores: 1152
  • Base Clock: 1506MHz (1594MHz on MSI model)
  • Boost Clock: 1708MHz (1796MHz on MSI model)
  • Texture Units: 72
  • Memory Clock: 8GHz
  • Memory Bandwidth: 192GB/s
  • ROPs: 48
  • L2 Cache Size: 1536KB
  • Transistors: 4.4 billion
  • Die Size: 200mm2
  • Process: 16nm FinFet
  • Connectors: 3x DisplayPort, 1x HDMI 2.0, 1x Dual-Link DVI
  • Power Connector: 1x 6-pin (1x 8-pin on MSI model)
  • TDP: 120W

The Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 in its 6GB guise starts at £240/$250, while the cut-back model sees a £50/$50 reduction, starting at £190/$199.

But there are mitigating factors here. The GTX 1060 3GB is only a touch more expensive than AMD’s RX 470 and the performance advantage Nvidia offers is undeniable in most titles. It’s $60 cheaper than the fully enabled 6GB model, and even the UK price is reasonable at £180. And then there’s the fact that Nvidia’s memory compression is good. It’s really good. It’s demonstrably more efficient than AMD’s, to the point where comparisons between the three gig GTX 1060 and the four gig RX 470 should prove fascinating.

Rich presents a video review of the GTX 1060 in its 3GB guise, stacked up against the fully-enabled 6GB version – plus the AMD competition.

While there have been compromises to bring the price down, it’s important to note that while some elements of the GTX 1060 3GB spec have been pared back, other aspects remain fully intact. Base clocks and boost clocks are exactly the same, for example. In fact, there is no Founders Edition this time – no reference board, in effect – so most of the GTX 1060s out there will have a factory overclock of some description. The MSI Gaming X card we were sent for review actually has a meaty 88MHz boost to the core clock and a somewhat less significant 40MHz added to the GDDR5 RAM. The memory base spec also remains unchanged from the six gig GTX 1060 – we’re looking at a 192-bit memory bus running 8gbps memory for a final memory bandwidth tally of 192GB/s.

Testing here is split into our usual resolution breakdowns – and for a card of this class, we’re looking at 1080p and 1440p resolutions. Our aim here is to confirm GTX 1060 3GB’s relationship performance-wise to its bigger brother, and also to stack up the card against AMD’s four gig RX 480 and RX 470 (note: our data here comes from an MSI factory overclocked model). And finally, we really need to get to the bottom of the VRAM situation – to stack up Pascal’s enviable memory compression and Nvidia’s driver memory management against the ‘luxury’ of an addition gigabyte of VRAM found in the RX products.

As a sub-£200 graphics card, the new GTX 1060 is clearly aimed at those gaming at 1080p resolution – by far the most popular type of display. And that’s where we’ll begin with our benchmarks. There are few surprises here – the GTX 1060, overall, is a best in class performer, winning seven of the eight benchmarks against AMD products in the same price bracket.

The GTX 1060 in three gig form takes on RX 470 and RX 480, plus its six gig sibling in our video benchmarks above.

1920×1080 (1080p) GTX 1060 3GB MSI GTX 1060 3GB GTX 1060 6GB GTX 970 4GB MSI RX 470 4GB RX 480 4GB RX 480 8GB
Assassin’s Creed Unity, Ultra High, FXAA 55.2 57.0 58.2 51.3 48.8 50.4 50.8
Ashes of the Singularity, Extreme, 0x MSAA, DX12 46.8 46.6 45.9 40.5 45.2 45.9 47.7
Crysis 3, Very High, SMAA T2x 74.8 77.2 78.7 72.5 68.0 68.8 70.1
The Division, Ultra, SMAA 54.3 55.5 56.6 50.2 51.3 53.6 54.8
Far Cry Primal, Ultra, SMAA 63.1 64.7 65.6 56.2 54.7 57.1 58.7
Hitman, Ultra, SMAA, DX12 57.7 59.7 65.8 59.0 68.6 71.4 73.2
Rise of the Tomb Raider, Very High, High Textures, SMAA, DX12 74.2 74.3 75.1 69.7 64.1 65.4 66.0
The Witcher 3, Ultra, Post AA, No HairWorks 64.7 66.5 68.4 60.7 57.9 60.5 61.2

The numbers are confirmed. By running the MSI Gaming card in its silent mode, the GTX 1060 3GB we have here matches the reference clocks – with boost topping out just below 1.9GHz, just like its bigger brother. However, a 10 per cent deficit in CUDA cores does indeed translate to the five per cent drop in performance stated by Nvidia. This delta is mitigated somewhat by the factory overclock found in our MSI model, which generally sits as a mid-point between reference GTX 1060 3GB and 6GB models.

In almost all cases, the budget Nvidia offering outperforms the RX 470 (and remember, this will be boosted by a couple of frames owing to its factory OC) along with both iterations of the RX 480. Even Ashes of the Singularity – a weak point for Nvidia – sees it offer basic parity across the run of the clip. In all of the benches here, there is no evidence to suggest that the 3GB framebuffer causes issues – except in one title, Hitman. Here, the performance drop-off on GTX 1060 3GB is significant – and we strongly suspect that DX12, where the developer takes over memory management duties, sees the card hit its VRAM limit. Notably, this does not happen on the AMD cards with four gigs of memory.

Hitman is also notable in that it is the only benchmark where we see the GTX 970 pull ahead of the GTX 1060, if only by a small margin. However, again, VRAM is the likely culprit – in terms of processing power, GTX 1060 3GB is clearly ahead of GTX 970, so by a process of elimination, the three gigabyte limit on the new card is the limiting factor.

Both GTX 1060s are good to go for 1440p gameplay, but careful settings tweaks are essential – especially when it comes to texture levels on the three gig model.

2560×1440 (1440p) GTX 1060 3GB MSI GTX 1060 3GB GTX 1060 6GB GTX 970 4GB MSI RX 470 4GB RX 480 4GB RX 480 8GB
Assassin’s Creed Unity, Ultra High, FXAA 32.4 33.5 37.4 32.7 29.6 31.0 33.8
Ashes of the Singularity, Extreme, 0x MSAA, DX12 41.3 41.6 41.2 35.9 40.1 40.7 42.7
Crysis 3, Very High, SMAA T2x 45.6 47.4 47.7 43.8 41.3 41.8 43.1
The Division, Ultra, SMAA 37.7 38.9 39.9 36.1 37.2 38.1 39.0
Far Cry Primal, Ultra, SMAA 42.7 43.9 45.0 39.6 39.2 40.7 42.3
Hitman, Ultra, SMAA, DX12 41.0 42.1 48.1 41.5 50.0 52.2 55.0
Rise of the Tomb Raider, Very High, High Textures, SMAA, DX12 47.8 47.8 49.2 46.1 43.2 45.0 45.8
The Witcher 3, Ultra, Post AA, No HairWorks 45.4 46.9 48.2 31.9 41.9 43.5 45.3

At 2560×1440, the numbers tend to close up when the lower-end GTX 1060 is stacked up against the AMD competition – and the five per cent delta in performance against the full-fat model remains in effect. In addition to the noticeable deficit that remains in Hitman, there is a clear deviation in the data for Assassin’s Creed Unity and Hitman, showing that we are hitting VRAM limits.

This is confirmed by the memory utilisation when monitored using MSI Afterburner, but more telling are the frame-times, which sees regular latency spikes – a classic sign of VRAM over-commitment. It’s interesting to note that the GTX 970 hands in the same average frame-rate overall, but has none of the spikes – once again it suggests that the additional memory demonstrably helps here.

Titles like Crysis 3, The Division and The Witcher 3 amongst others clearly show that there is no degradation in performance when VRAM is managed well. However, the higher you scale native rendering resolution, the more desirable higher quality textures become. From a processor performance perspective, clearly the cut-down GP106 chip has the power to run 1440p gaming – but memory is clearly much more of an issue here; we need to house the same texture data as we do at 1080p, but the render targets internally generated to create the final scene increase in size by up to 77 per cent. Pascal’s excellent memory compression here can only go so far and its effectiveness will vary on a scene-by-scene nature.

By and large, the three gig GTX 1060 copes with our benchmarks well, but a closer look at the VRAM problem titles – Hitman and Assassin’s Creed Unity – show something interesting. Stutter isn’t a major issue as we thought it might be (as data shuttles to and from system RAM to VRAM) but instead we see a general depression in performance. So in Unity for example, the expected five per cent delta between the 3GB and 6GB GTX 1060s increases to 15 per cent at 1440p. The 4GB AMD cards exhibit more stutter, but still operate roughly at their expected performance level. This begs the question – can a 3GB Nvidia card match or beat a 4GB AMD product?

The AC Unity data suggests so, but our next test – designed to heavily over-commit VRAM – demonstrates that having that additional gigabyte of VRAM certainly helps the Radeon products. We re-ran our Rise of the Tomb Raider benchmark at 1080p with the very high textures engaged – something the developer warns against specifically. There are three sections to this bench: in the first, the three gig GTX 1060 keeps up with its more expensive sibling, but as we move into the second and third areas, we hit a short period of stutter followed by sustained, lower frame-rates.

And what we find here is that the RX 470 – demonstrably the weaker card when VRAM is not being tested – actually moves into the lead during the majority of the bench, and it seems that it’s just about capable of housing the required texture data without dropping performance. Of course, it’s just a limited set of data on a test that the developers specifically recommends we don’t run. But the point is that we can demonstrate that there are some applications where four gigs at 1080p is indeed better than three – even factoring in Nvidia’s superior memory compression technology.

It’s a GTX 1060 face-off at 1080p and 1440p – here you can see the impact of the VRAM and shader differentials between the two cards in one video.

Bearing in mind that the GTX 1060 3GB supplied by MSI already has an 88MHz factory overclock in place, hopes weren’t high that we could push this card much further. After all, it boosts to 2GHz out of the box (!) when set to OC mode. However, we were wrong. Pushing up power to max and adding 190MHz to the core, we could hit a remarkable 2.19GHz – rock-solid on our Crysis 3 stress-test, but buckling as soon as we hit 2.2GHz. These are the highest core clocks we’ve ever seen from any Pascal chip, but unfortunately our surprise was short-lived – Ashes of the Singularity wasn’t stable at all, and we had to drop down to 140MHz. However, this is still on top of the factory OC and a remarkable result overall. The GDDR5 RAM handled a +450MHz offset, bringing up up to 8.9GHz effective. Again, that’s not bad.

Re-benching a few titles, the impact of the overclock becomes clear – we’re looking at a 12 per cent increase in performance over the GTX 1060’s stock configuration, dropping to eight per cent when compared to the factory OC we have with the MSI Gaming X’s set-up. This isn’t exactly a revelatory increase overall – the days of 20 per cent overclocks with the last-gen 900-series Maxwell cards are clearly over. However, it is enough to push the cut-down GP106 clear of the fully enabled version when we’re not limited by VRAM.

Power consumption from Pascal continues to be highly impressive. Perhaps not surprisingly, the MSI card – with its custom PCB and factory overclock – managed to consume a touch more power than the standard Founders Edition 6GB version, but we’re still looking at an extremely creditable result overall at 234W. What’s remarkable here are the thermals. Even when we had the MSI model running at 2.19GHz, the core hit a maximum of just 67 degrees Celsius. This is way, way better than the six gig Founders Edition we have and based on our much better overclock and lower temps, we reckon that the six gig MSI version could be rather impressive.

GTX 1060 3GB GTX 1060 3GB OC GTX 1060 6GB GTX 970 MSI RX 470 RX 480
Peak System Power Draw 234W 250W 230W 295W 283W 271W