Pokemon GO Data Being Sold To Advertisers? Redditors Concerned About Lack of Clarity.

It should be no surprise that like a trail of digital breadcrumbs, Pokemon GO can track where you are, where you’re going, and how long you’ve been there. By design, the game relies on your location to beam various Poke-related content to your mobile device – and how it knows you’re at Pokestops and Gyms.

What might be surprising is many gamers don’t know what’s happening to that data after it’s collected. The EULA for Pokemon Go states data will be saved and aggregated to improve and personalize ‘services’, but makes no mention of selling it:

“We collect certain information that your (or your authorized child’s) mobile device sends when you (or your authorized child) use our Services, like a device identifier, user settings, and the operating system of your (or your authorized child’s) device, as well as information about your use of our Services while using the mobile device. We may use this information to provide the Services and to improve and personalize our Services for you (or your authorized child).”

This concern came to the attention of many Pokemon Go players after a reddit thread shot to the top of the Pokemon Go forum. Reddit User “publikwerks” posed the question:

“Reading about how kids younger than 13 cannot see/interact with sponsor’s gyms/pokestops got me thinking about why. I ran into this with my son when we were driving around collecting pokestops, and he couldn’t see the pokestop at all. Initally, I thought “Starbucks must not want kids hanging around”.

But now it dawned on me that the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act might come into play….if Niantic is sharing user data with the sponsors as part of the deal. So has anyone heard anything about Niantic sharing data?”

The responses ranged from denial, to outrage to curiosity. User ‘SlapHappyDude’ explained there isn’t much cause for alarm:

“The good news is most companies are really only interested in aggregate data for marketing purposes. Knowing when John Smith of Canton, Ohio likes to eat lunch is far less useful than knowing where the 1,000 Pokemon players in Canton, Ohio tend to go (made up numbers obviously)”

However, in a reply, user Amogh24 stated: “For now atleast. Data is the new oil, it won’t be used for civil purposes only, it’s used for war”

User Grimey_Rick offered a more forceful rebuttal:

“So? So does Amazon. And whoever else you interact with online. Why is this news to people? If it’s not news, why do you care all of a sudden? Does this sub really not get tired of looking for reasons to bash Niantic?”

The concern regarding data collection is that users are unsure if their data is being sold, and if so, to who, and for what purposes. Knowing the age of players, where they go, and when they go there would be invaluable for marketing and PR companies who could place billboards or advertising – or entire businesses targeted at specific demographics in the most heavily traveled areas – among other advantages.

Sponsors do currently pay money to Pokemon Go’s developer, Niantic, to create Pokestops at businesses most likely to get foot traffic. For example your local McDonalds may be a Pokestop because a lot of players go there – or because McDonalds wants you to go there – and Niantic will charge them per-visit. Though in that case it’s more Niantic using your data to make a deal, versus selling your data outright.

At this point, this is all speculation – but genuine concern. The EULA makes no mention of selling DATA, but does admit it will share it with third parties in aggregate form.

Stay tuned for updates and a quote from Niantic as it becomes available.

Monday’s Vital Data: Tesla Inc. (TSLA), Nvidia Corporation (NVDA) and Apple Inc. (AAPL)

Options activity provides a look at expectations on TSLA, NVDA and AAPL stocks

U.S. stock futures are pointed lower this morning, as Wall Street continues to struggle with the idea of tightening monetary policy. Last week, the Federal Reserve promised to begin quantitative tightening, signaling the beginning of the end for easy money. Furthermore, there are a slew of Fed speakers this week, Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen, on Tuesday, and Vice Chair Stanley Fischer, on Thursday.

Monday’s Vital Data: Tesla Inc. (TSLA), Nvidia Corporation (NVDA) and Apple Inc. (AAPL)As a result, futures on the Dow Jones Industrial Average are down 0.02%, S&P 500 futures are off 0.04% and Nasdaq-100 futures have slipped 0.09%.

In the options pits, volume remained below average and put volume gained considerable traction. Overall, about 12.3 million calls and 12.7 million puts changed hands on Friday, pushing the daily put/call volume ratio north of 1.00. On the CBOE, the single-session equity put/call volume ratio jumped to 0.77 — a six-week high — while the 10-day moving average held at 0.63 in one-month high territory.

Taking a closer look at Friday’s volume, Tesla Inc (NASDAQ:TSLA) logged its worst week in two months on Model 3 production and profitability concerns. Elsewhere, Nvidia Corporation (NASDAQ:NVDA) retreated on analyst projections that demand from cryptocurrency miners is beginning to cool down. Finally, short lines for the iPhone 8 release weighed heavily on Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) options activity.

Monday’s Vital Options Data: Tesla Inc. (TSLA), Nvidia Corporation (NVDA) and Apple Inc (AAPL)

Tesla Inc. (TSLA)

TSLA stock logged its worst losing streak in two months last week, dropping 7.6% by the close on Friday.

Concerns that Model 3 production isn’t ramping up fast enough and Jefferies’ prediction that Tesla would lose money until at least 2020 provided a case for TSLA bears. Jefferies also initiated coverage on TSLA stock with an  “underperform” rating and a $280 price target — a 20% drop from current levels.

Option volume on TSLA was strong on Friday, with more than 288,000 contracts changing hands — more than doubling the stock’s average daily volume. Calls only made up 53% of that activity, though, arriving below average for TSLA. Meanwhile, front-month October puts remained popular with TSLA, as the put/call open interest ratio arrived at 1.11, indicating that profit taking or loss control may have been the motivation for Friday’s call activity.

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Article printed from InvestorPlace Media, https://investorplace.com/2017/09/monday-vital-data-tesla-inc-tsla-nvidia-corporation-nvda-apple-inc-aapl/.

©2017 InvestorPlace Media, LLC

Data-transfer app AnyTrans 6 moves iOS and Android data to new iPhone

This post is brought to you by iMobie, maker of AnyTrans.

There’s no denying it — the new iPhones look amazing. So it’s no surprise if you’re already plotting how to get one. But with any new device comes the challenge of moving the important stuff from your old one.

For iOS users, iTunes can make migrating a hassle. For Android users switching to iOS, it’s even more complicated. That makes iMobie’s updated all-in-one iPhone manager, AnyTrans 6, an exciting app. Available for macOS and Windows, it’s an ideal bridge between your old iOS or Android phone and a new one.

AnyTrans transfers data from iPhone to iPhone

This newest version of AnyTrans uses a clean, easy-to-navigate menu with clearly defined tools. iPhone users can migrate 34 types of content, including photos, messages, contacts, videos, and so on. Users with data on more than one old iPhone can use the Merge Device feature to bring the contents of both into a new iPhone. You can also clone your device with — you guessed it — the Clone Device feature, no iTunes backup needed.

If your iPhone is missing key data, even if it’s specific to a single app, you can avoid a full restore. Instead, through the AnyTrans interface you can select the missing files and move them to the proper app. And, of course, you can also make the same transfers to your iPad, Mac, iTunes and iCloud accounts.

iMobie simplifies the complex task of migrating to a new iPhone.
iMobie simplifies the complex task of migrating to a new iPhone.
Photo: iMobie

Move data from Android to iPhone

Earlier builds of AnyTrans 6 introduced the iOS Mover feature, which transfers Android data to iOS with one click. Other apps, like Move to iOS, do similar work. But according to iMobie, AnyTrans 6 is the only tool that allows you to freely select and transfer specific files.

For Android users eyeing a new iPhone, it’s all great news. (It’s also free for anyone to use.)

AnyTrans 6 makes it a single-click affair to transfer data from Android to iPhone. In contrast with Move to iOS, there’s no need to reset the iPhone or go into airplane mode on the Android device to make it all work.

As mentioned above, you can either fully migrate, or select just what you need to transfer. Text messages, call logs, contacts, music, videos, ringtones, books, compressed files — AnyTrans makes sure it all flows to the appropriate spot in your new iPhone. The software automatically converts videos and audio. Calendars load up automatically, too.

It all feels easier than it should be.

Try iMobie AnyTrans 6 for free

Additionally, AnyTrans offers free features anybody can use. The iCloud Manager adds another layer of utility for organizing backups. There’s even a built-in media downloader that can deliver content from streaming sites like YouTube and Vimeo straight to your iOS video folder.

You can get a free trial of AnyTrans from the iMobie website. If you like it, a single AnyTrans license costs just $39.99. It’s well worth taking AnyTrans for a test drive, especially if you’re an Android user looking to make the move to iPhone.

Scoop Business » Symantec Protects Data with Information Centric Security

Press Release – Symantec

Symantec Data Loss Prevention 15 integrates with tagging, encryption and access management to secure regulated and sensitive data wherever it goesSymantec Protects Data Everywhere with Information Centric Security

Symantec Data Loss Prevention 15 integrates with tagging, encryption and access management to secure regulated and sensitive data wherever it goes

AUCKLAND, New Zealand – 21 September 2017 – Symantec Corp., a global leader in cyber security, today announced the release of Data Loss Prevention (DLP) version 15 providing increased data protection automation and product integration to strengthen the Information Centric Security solution. These major enhancements provide a greater ability to discover, monitor and protect sensitive or regulated data even in unmanaged environments.

Organisations are losing visibility and control over sensitive and regulated data as it is shared with a wide range of users across multiple organisations and stored in various locations, including the cloud.

Nearly 1 in 3 IT security executives believes data loss is the greatest internal threat to businesses this year (Symantec CISO research 2016), with concerns about shadow applications and malicious users. The problem continues to grow, with data breaches in 2016 resulting in 1.1 billion identities being exposed — double the number in 2015 per the Internet Security Threat Report volume 22 published in 2017.

The upcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) introduces new obligations for organisations and the information they handle, and comes with increased penalties and heightened scrutiny for compliance. Analysts believe that visibility and protection, which can follow data, will become the new imperative.

Symantec’s Information Centric Security solution allows organisations to store, use and share sensitive data outside their managed environment with external users or cloud apps. Greater protection is ensured because data access is limited to authorized viewers, reducing the risk of unwanted exposure. This Information Centric Security approach helps ensure safe collaboration and helps to enable compliance for stringent regulations such as GDPR. The release of Symantec DLP 15 extends this capability through enhanced integration with cloud access security broker, data classification, user-entity behavioral analytics and information-centric encryption to support a wider range of communication channels.

Symantec DLP 15 highlights include:

• Protects sensitive data in managed and unmanaged environments and when handled by third-parties

• Helps to enable compliance with GDPR

• Helps ensure sensitive data doesn’t get leaked through shadow applications.

“The sheer volume of data and the speed at which it moves around organisations has magnified the data loss problem. Sensitive data needs to be tracked everywhere – even outside the organisation – to ensure security and maintain compliance with a growing roster of industry regulations,” said Doug Cahill, Senior Analyst, ESG.

“With so much at stake, it is no longer possible to depend on manual tagging or any other process that invites the possibility of human error. With Symantec DLP 15, we’ve given IT managers the ability to automatically tag data as sensitive and automate security policies that follow that data everywhere it goes, regardless of channel,” commented Nico Popp, Senior Vice President, Symantec.

Symantec Information Centric Security is available through integrations between the following products, all of which are already available globally:

• Symantec DLP 15 + CloudSOC (CASB)

• ICT

• ICE

• ICA

• VIP.

https://www.symantec.com/products/data-loss-prevention

https://www.symantec.com/solutions/information-centric-security
ENDS

Content Sourced from scoop.co.nz
Original url

Symantec Protects Data with Information Centric Security

Symantec Protects Data Everywhere with Information
Centric Security

Symantec Data Loss Prevention 15
integrates with tagging, encryption and access management to
secure regulated and sensitive data wherever it
goes

AUCKLAND, New Zealand – 21 September 2017
Symantec Corp., a global leader in cyber
security, today announced the release of Data Loss
Prevention (DLP) version 15 providing increased data
protection automation and product integration to strengthen
the Information Centric Security solution. These major
enhancements provide a greater ability to discover, monitor
and protect sensitive or regulated data even in unmanaged
environments.

Organisations are losing visibility and
control over sensitive and regulated data as it is shared
with a wide range of users across multiple organisations and
stored in various locations, including the cloud.

Nearly
1 in 3 IT security executives believes data loss is the
greatest internal threat to businesses this year (Symantec
CISO research 2016), with concerns about shadow applications
and malicious users. The problem continues to grow, with
data breaches in 2016 resulting in 1.1 billion identities
being exposed — double the number in 2015 per the Internet
Security Threat Report volume 22 published in 2017.

The
upcoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)
introduces new obligations for organisations and the
information they handle, and comes with increased penalties
and heightened scrutiny for compliance. Analysts believe
that visibility and protection, which can follow data, will
become the new imperative.

Symantec’s Information
Centric Security solution allows organisations to store, use
and share sensitive data outside their managed environment
with external users or cloud apps. Greater protection is
ensured because data access is limited to authorized
viewers, reducing the risk of unwanted exposure. This
Information Centric Security approach helps ensure safe
collaboration and helps to enable compliance for stringent
regulations such as GDPR. The release of Symantec DLP 15
extends this capability through enhanced integration with
cloud access security broker, data classification,
user-entity behavioral analytics and information-centric
encryption to support a wider range of communication
channels.

Symantec DLP 15 highlights
include:

• Protects sensitive data in managed and
unmanaged environments and when handled by
third-parties

• Helps to enable compliance with
GDPR

• Helps ensure sensitive data doesn’t get leaked
through shadow applications.

“The sheer volume of data
and the speed at which it moves around organisations has
magnified the data loss problem. Sensitive data needs to be
tracked everywhere – even outside the organisation – to
ensure security and maintain compliance with a growing
roster of industry regulations,” said Doug Cahill, Senior
Analyst, ESG.

“With so much at stake, it is no longer
possible to depend on manual tagging or any other process
that invites the possibility of human error. With Symantec
DLP 15, we’ve given IT managers the ability to
automatically tag data as sensitive and automate security
policies that follow that data everywhere it goes,
regardless of channel,” commented Nico Popp, Senior Vice
President, Symantec.

Symantec Information Centric Security
is available through integrations between the following
products, all of which are already available
globally:

• Symantec DLP 15 + CloudSOC
(CASB)

• ICT

• ICE

• ICA

• VIP.

https://www.symantec.com/products/data-loss-prevention

https://www.symantec.com/solutions/information-centric-security

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 

ChainLink raises $32 million to connect blockchains with external data

San Francisco blockchain startup ChainLink has pulled in $32 million through its presale and initial coin offering, which closed yesterday. The company provides middleware to enable “smart contracts” running on a blockchain to access external data.

Smart contracts, or self-executing contracts, are one of the exciting promises of blockchain tech. They allow businesses and individuals to set service-level agreements with each other.

For example, imagine if airlines started offering smart contracts that would automatically refund 20 percent of your ticket fare if your flight misses its departure time by more than an hour. Or imagine if medical shipments to pharmacies were automatically halted and returned to the manufacturer if the shipping temperature exceeded a contracted limit.

As Coin Sciences’ Gideon Greenspan explains, these kinds of pie-in-the-sky use cases for blockchain have been unrealistic to date, since blockchains haven’t been able to reliably access a wide range of external data. But ChainLink plans to change that. It offers contract makers a whole network of “oracles,” or trusted external data sources, to choose from. With ChainLink, you can have a contract query one or several different oracles to check, say, flight departure times.

“When you type ‘interest rates’ into the ChainLink search bar, you’ll get a list of some 50 data feeds to choose from,” explained CEO Sergey Nazarov. “You copy and paste [from that data feed page on ChainLink] what your contract needs to do and copy that into your contract.” The developers who connect APIs to ChainLink are compensated with ChainLink’s LINK token each time someone uses their feed by the contracts that are requesting data from those feeds.

The company has had about 3,700 emails from developers interested in running a ChainLink, Nazarov said.

ChainLink was spawned from 3.5 year-old company SmartContract, which does one-off enterprise smart contract rollouts. So far SmartContract’s biggest client has been inter-bank transaction network SWIFT, which has 11,000 banks in its network.

But one-off rollouts take time, require a hand-tailored API, and are, in effect, hard-wired to the chosen oracle; they don’t give you the flexibility of deciding how many data sources to query.

ChainLink will bring smart contract capabillites to anyone with high security and a lot more choice.

Without ChainLink’s network, Nazarov said, a company wanting to deploy a smart contract able to interact with an external data feed needs to develop an API for that data feed and then go to one of the few middleware providers working in this space who then wrap the necessary rules and calls into the smart contract. The application developer doesn’t get much flexibility in deciding how many of the blockchain’s nodes should query the data feed or how many data sources to query. Security is also a big concern. “If we’re transacting billions of dollars on these systems, we need them to be secure end-to-end,” said Nazarov. Having a decentralized system make a call to a single data source in order to execute a multimillion dollar contract could leave the system open to manipulation.

The coming generation of open-source oracles will come with more options and more security. Developers will be able to have their smart contracts query multiple disparate data feeds from many different nodes, cross-check them for consistency, possibly averaging the various inputs to reduce the chance of error.

ChainLink’s capabilties aren’t ready for rollout yet — the company is still working on its network — but the fresh fundraise should help move that work along.

Even after the company’s oracle network is rolled out, it could take five or so years to reach maturity, Nazarov explained. The biggest data providers realize this new model could be good business for them, but they’re not willing to take the jump until they see a decent volume of smart contracts in play. So we’ll likely see smaller and mid-sized data providers move in first, with the rest following later. And the pace at which key data feeds become available will, to a certain extent, dictate how quickly the whole ecosystem is able to develop.

Wednesday’s Vital Data: Apple Inc. (AAPL), AT&T Inc. (T) and Nvidia Corporation (NVDA)

U.S. stock futures are in a holding pattern this morning, as Wall Street awaits the results of the Federal Open Market Committee’s two-day policy meeting. While a rate hike isn’t on the table, the Federal Reserve is expected to detail how it plans to wind down its massive balance sheet. Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen will hold a press conference following the announcement today at 2 p.m. Eastern.

Wednesday’s Vital Data: Apple Inc. (AAPL), AT&T Inc. (T) and Nvidia Corporation (NVDA) andWith that in mind, it’s no surprise that futures on the Dow Jones Industrial Average, S&P 500 and Nasdaq-100 are all trading within a 0.04-point range this morning.

In the options pits, options traders were also reluctant to take up positions ahead of the Fed’s decision on monetary policy. Volume nosedived to about 12.1 million calls and 10.8 million puts on Tuesday. Over on the CBOE, the single-session equity put/call volume ratio expressed a bit of concern, rising to a two-week high of 0.67. The 10-day moving average held pat at 0.61.

Taking a closer look at Tuesday’s volume, Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) saw call volume fall off its recent highs following comments from CEO Tim Cook on the iPhone X’s lofty price tag. Meanwhile, AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T) also drew low call volume amid a flurry of news including rumors it may sell its Latin America pay TV business. Finally, Nvidia Corporation (NASDAQ:NVDA) stock struggled to makes gains despite another bullish analyst comment from RBC Capital Markets.

Wednesday’s Vital Options Data: Apple Inc (AAPL), AT&T Inc (T) and Nvidia Corporation (NVDA) and

Apple Inc. (AAPL)

While both the financial and tech media are buzzing about the $999-plus price tag for the new iPhone X, CEO Tim Cook told ABC’s “Good Morning America” he wasn’t all that concerned. “It’s a value price, actually, for the technology you’re getting,” Cook said. In downplaying the price, Cook remained unworried about the potential impact on iPhone sales, stating, “Apple has never been about selling the most of anything … Our objective is not big revenues.”

While Cook’s objective might not be big revenue, AAPL investors certainly disagree. The stock has dipped from its pre-iPhone X perch above $160, and the shares are struggling to challenge this area so far this week.

AAPL options traders have taken note, and call volume is falling as a result. On Tuesday, some 249,000 contracts traded on AAPL, numbering less than half the stock’s daily average volume. Furthermore, calls only made up 61% of the day’s take, down sharply from the 67% range heading into the iPhone event.

Options trading can be a leading indicator for AAPL stock, and in this case, the sentiment is pointing toward at least a short-term decline for the shares.

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T-Mobile boosts data throttling threshold to 50GB per month

ces-2017-tmobile-t-mobile-john-legere-9635.jpg

T-Mobile CEO John Legere is at it again. 


Josh Miller/CNET

T-Mobile customers on the carrier’s unlimited data plans will soon get to use at least 50 gigabytes of data each month before they face a possible speed reduction.

T-Mobile, the third-largest wireless player — well behind Verizon and AT&T — previously warned that it may reduce customers’ download speeds once they had consumed 32GB of data each month. The wireless carrier said Tuesday that threshold will increase to 50GB starting Wednesday.

The big four wireless carriers all offer plans with unlimited talk, texting and data. But when you hit a certain data limit, your data speeds are slowed down or your data needs are sent to the back of the line. AT&T and Verizon Wireless currently have 22GB data limits, while Sprint sets its limit at 23GB.

T-Mobile said the new limit means only the top 1 percent of data users will face a possible reduction in speeds, compared with the previous 3 percent.

“When T-Mobile customers who use the most data hit these prioritization points during the month, they get in line behind other customers who have used less data and may experience reduced speeds,” the company said in a blog post. “But this impacts them only very rarely, like when there is a big line, and it resets every month.”

The boost comes after T-Mobile and Netflix announced a partnership earlier this month that will give many subscribers to T-Mobile’s “One” unlimited data plans free access to Netflix. But the freebie only works if you have at least two T-Mobile One unlimited data voice lines (single line customers are out of luck).

It’s Complicated: This is dating in the age of apps. Having fun yet? These stories get to the heart of the matter.

Mobile World Congress 2017: All the coolest new phones and wearables from the trade show in Barcelona.

Apple taking an ‘immense risk’ with user data thanks to poor implementation of differential privacy, say academics

Researchers at three universities have accused Apple of taking an ‘immense risk’ with the security of user data thanks to what they say is a poor implementation of differential privacy.

Differential privacy is a method of allowing Apple and other companies to analyse user data in a way intended to be completely anonymous. Enough noise is injected into the data that it is supposed to be impossible to match any of that data to a specific individual.

However, security researchers have for the second time questioned how well Apple’s implementation works in practice …

NordVPN

A cryptography professor from John Hopkins last year accused Apple of failing to adequately test its approach, and using a custom implementation whose safety could not be independently verified because Apple chooses not to share the code.

Wired reports that researchers at the University of Southern California, Indiana University, and China’s Tsinghua University have now gone much further than this. They reverse-engineered some of the differential privacy code used by Apple and said that the protection was so poor as to be pointless.

If you’re not up to speed on differential privacy, we ran an explainer last year. The bottom line is that Apple gathers personal data from everyone who opts in, and then adds some ‘noise’ to that data designed to make it impossible to work out which data came from which person.

The effectiveness of that noise is measured by something called the epsilon value, where the lower the number, the greater the protection. Most security researchers consider the ideal value to be 1. Any number above that puts data privacy at risk. The researchers say the numbers used by Apple are scary.

The research team determined that MacOS’s implementation of differential privacy uses an epsilon of 6, while iOS 10 has an epsilon of 14. As that epsilon value increases, the risk that an individual user’s specific data can be ascertained increases exponentially.

And it’s not just random researchers who hold this view, says the Wired piece: one of the inventors of differential privacy, Frank McSherry, agrees.

“Anything much bigger than one is not a very reassuring guarantee,” McSherry says. “Using an epsilon value of 14 per day strikes me as relatively pointless” as a safeguard […]

“Apple has put some kind of handcuffs on in how they interact with your data,” he says. “It just turns out those handcuffs are made out of tissue paper.”

McSherry explains the risk with a very practical example of someone who has a 1-in-a-million medical condition uploading data from the Health app.

After one upload obfuscated with an injection of random data, McSherry says, the company’s data analysts would be able to figure out with 50 percent certainty whether the person had the condition. After two days of uploads, the analysts would know about that medical condition with virtually 100 percent certainty.

Apple denies the claim, accusing the researchers of a fundamental misunderstanding in the way they calculated the epsilon values. The company says that they added together the various epsilon values to reach a total for a given upload, assuming that all that data could be correlated by Apple.

Apple says it doesn’t correlate those different kinds of data—that it’s not sure how disparate data types like emoji use and health data could be meaningfully correlated. And it adds that it also doesn’t assemble profiles of individuals over time, institutes limits on storing data that would make that correlation impossible, and throws out any data like IP addresses that could be used as unique identifiers to tie any findings to a particular person.

The researchers argue that this relies on users trusting Apple not to abuse the data, when the whole point of differential privacy is to provide mathematical guarantees that it isn’t possible to do so.

We ran a poll on differential privacy when Apple began using it to collect web-browsing and health data. At that point, the majority of you were either 100% or very comfortable with Apple doing so, while 9% were 100% or very uncomfortable.

We’ve reached out to Apple for comment, and will update with any response. If you want to opt out from Apple’s data collection, you can do so in Settings > Privacy then scroll to Analytics at the bottom and switch off the ‘Share iPhone & Watch Analytics Data’ toggle.


Check out 9to5Mac on YouTube for more Apple news: