Auction Preview: Silver & Vertu Signature Auction at Heritage Auctions, Dallas, Oct 17

What: Sale of Intricate Silverworks and Jewelry

Where: Heritage Auctions, Design District Showroom, 1518 Slocum Street, Dallas, TX 75207

When: Oct 17, 2017, 10.00 am CT

Public Viewing: October 13 – 17, 2017

The auction features a selection of intricate and rare silver objects from silver flatware, hollowware, silver smalls, to estate jewelry, Asian art, and decorative arts.

Top Lots of the Sale:

– An Asprey 18K Gold, Diamond, Mother-of-Pearl, and Gemstone Tri-Fold Frame, London, 20th century,  5-1/8 inches high x 13 inches wide (13.0 x 33.0 cm) (fully extended). Estimate: US$ 100,000-US$150,000

– A Pair of German Silver and Hardstone-Mounted Jousting Knight Figures, probably Hanau, early 20th century, 14 inches high (35.6 cm) (each, including bases). Estimate: US$ 17,000 – US$20,000

– A Large R & S Garrard & Co. Victorian Silver Nautical Figural Trophy, London, 1863, 22-3/4 inches high (57.8 cm) (trophy), 28 inches high (71.1 cm) (including base). Estimate: US$ 30,000 – US$ 50,000

– A Matthew Boulton Silver and Cut-Glass Epergne, Birmingham, England, 1825, 19-3/8 inches high x 19 inches wide (49.2 x 48.3 cm). Estimate: US$ 15,000 – US$ 20,000

– An Eleven-Piece Cased French Enameled Silver Lady’s Vanity Set Retailed by Cartier, circa 1910, 9-3/4 inches long (24.8 cm) (longest, brush). Estimate: US$ 15,000 – US$ 25,000

– A Fabergé 14K Gold, Gilt Silver, Opalescent Enamel, Moss Agate, and Diamond Vanity Case, workmaster’s marks for Henrik Wigstrom, St. Petersburg, Russia, 0-5/8 h x 4-1/8 w x 1-5/8 d inches (1.6 x 10.5 x 4.1 cm). Estimate: US$ 20,000 – US$ 30,000

– A Twelve-Piece International Silver Co. Art Deco Silver and Enamel Cocktail Service, circa 1930, comprising tray, pitcher, and ten stems. Estimate: US$ 15,000 – US$ 20,000

For details, visit: https://www.ha.com/

Click on the slideshow for the highlights of the sale

Vertu’s phones still remain expensive despite Auction – TechSource International

Screen Shot 2017-08-13 at 12.52.30

In July, iconic British phone manufacturer Vertu pulled down its shutters and entered liquidation after the exiled Turkish businessman Murat Hakan Uzan failed to rescue the company from bankruptcy.

The company caused job losses for up to 200 of its employees and now on Friday, Vertu’s museum collection of handsets went to the auction for sale by liquidators. The British luxury phone maker was forced to sell all the contents from its British plant located in Hampshire, in the United Kingdom including awards, ultra-luxury phones, drawings, designs and statues.

Vertu’s Clous De Paris Red Gold Signature phone that were encrusted in jewels and 18-karat gold sold for over £35,600 or USD$46,000.

Vertu's Signature range of Smartphones

Vertu’s Signature range of Smartphones

For those unfamiliar, Vertu was a British boutique phone maker, that was popular among the global rich and famous but yet was unable to attract newer customers, leading to its failure. 

The company’s ultra-exorbitant handsets boasted of customised solid gold, sapphire glass, titanium, precious jewels, and alligator leather. For instance, one of luxury phone maker’s Signature handset that were launched for £14,500 (USD$18,750) during its heyday, was sold at the auction for £11,200 (USD$14,500) whereas the ones like Clous De Paris Red Gold Signature phone that were encrusted in jewels and 18-karat gold sold for over £35,600  or USD$46,000.

Vertu Puts Up Entire Catalogue of 105 Models On Auction, Bid Starts At $26,000

UK based luxury phone manufacturer Vertu has put up all the entire catalogue of phones in the Vertu museum on auction. This is all part of the company’s winding-up process and is by the order of the liquidator appointed to liquidate the company’s asset. The entire collection of the Vertu museum includes 105 iconic phones and appearance models. The phones that will be in the collection will include models from the Signature, Constellation & Ascent Range right from when the first model was launched in 1998. Some the phones contain finishing with 18 carat gold, titanium, stainless steel, diamond and other precious stones.  Vertu SIGNATURE Cobra Limited Edition

The auction is coordinated by auctioneer G J Wisdom & Co and bidding starts at £20,000 ($26,000). This price is definitely a decent one for 105 phones considering that Vertu used to sell only a single unit for as high as $30,000 when the company was still booming. But now, the company is being liquidated and anything would do so that the creditors would recoup some of their money. The auction does not seem to include the recently launched premium models like the Signature Cobra priced at $360K.

Read More: Vertu SIGNATURE Cobra Limited Edition is Priced at $360K, Along with Delivery Via Helicopter

Vertu is well-known for rugged looking models with a premium design adorning ornaments such as gold, diamond and others on the body. The company has been in debt for a while now, with its debt burden estimated to be to the tune of 128 million pounds. The company was announced to have been bought by an exiled Turkish businessman but he has been unable to settle the huge pile of debt, hence the liquidation. The bid process will close by 7 pm (UK time) on today (August 11).

(source)

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Chair-ity Live Auction takes action to Facebook to aid young cancer patients, families | Entertainment

While many are inspired to stand up to fight cancer, an upcoming fundraiser invites you to take a seat. The Chair-ity Live Auction, taking place Sunday on Facebook, allows do-gooders to do good from the comfort of their home or wherever their smartphone takes them.

The event features bundles in nine categories — Backyard Americana, Man Cave, Children’s Reading, Pet Bed, Coffee, Disney, Secret Garden, Beachin’ and Western — that are up for auction. Teams assemble each collection, which includes a themed chair or some form of seating along with baskets with assorted goodies.

For the Beachin’ package, people will bid on the bundle including a Adirondack chair with umbrella, throw blanket and pillow, agate coasters, two custom sea glass necklaces, bucket of Coronas and beer salt, beach towels, extra-large cooler tote bag, gift cards and more. The Man Cave boasts two barstools made from kegs, beer crate with six-pack of beer, manly cookbook and candles, bacon jerky, custom-made bottle cap mirror, Lengthwise growlers and glassware, dart board and more.

Other inventories are posted on the Facebook event page, accessible via the Second Star to the Right’s page (facebook.com/SSTTR2016).

This is the fourth year that the local group, which helps children with cancer and their families, has held the auction. Jennifer Meiners, who is helping organize the fundraiser, said the group raised $5,000 last year and hopes to double that for 2017.

Bidding will take place from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday. Those who want to bid need only select “interested” or “going” on the event page to keep up on the bidding and take part. Organizers will follow up after the auction closes and make arrangements for payment and delivery, Meiners said.

Stefani Dias can be reached at 661-395-7488. Follow her on Twitter at @realstefanidias.

U.S. astronaut Armstrong’s moon bag to fetch up to $4 million at auction


The Apollo 11 Contingency Lunar Sample Return Bag used by astronaut Neil Armstrong is displayed for Sotheby's Space Exploration auction in New York City, U.S., July 13, 2017. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid  .
The
Apollo 11 Contingency Lunar Sample Return Bag used by astronaut
Neil Armstrong is displayed for Sotheby’s Space Exploration
auction in New York

Thomson
Reuters


By Taylor Harris

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The long-lost bag used by U.S. astronaut
Neil Armstrong to bring back to Earth the first samples of moon
dust is expected to sell for up to $4 million when it is
auctioned with other space memorabilia next week in New York
City.

The sale at international art auction house Sotheby’s also
features the Apollo 13 flight plan annotated by its crew, a
spacesuit worn by U.S. astronaut Gus Grissom, and lunar
photographs taken by the National Aeronautics and Space
Administration (NASA).

The auction will be held on July 20, the 48th anniversary of the
first moon landing, and organizers hope it will draw large
crowds.

“It (space) is one of few subjects that I think are not
culturally specific. It doesn’t matter your religion, where
you’re from, what language you speak,” Cassandra Hatton, a vice
president and senior specialist at Sotheby’s, said on Wednesday.

“We all have the common experience of staring up at the sky and
wondering what’s going on amongst the stars.”

The fate of the bag, which measures 12 inches by 8.5 inches and
is labeled “Lunar Sample Return”, was unknown for decades after
Armstrong and his Apollo 11 crew came home in July 1969.

For years it sat in a box, unidentified, at the Johnson Space
Center in Houston, Hatton said.

It ultimately surfaced in the garage of the manager of a Kansas
museum, Max Ary, who was convicted of its theft in 2014,
according to court records.

The bag was seized by the U.S. Marshals Service which put it up
for auction three times, drawing no bids, until it was bought in
2015 for $995 by a Chicago-area attorney, Nancy Lee Carlson.

She sent the bag to NASA for authentication, and when tests
revealed it was used by Armstrong and still had moon dust traces
inside, the U.S. space agency decided to keep it.

Carlson successfully sued NASA to get the bag back, and the
attention created by her legal challenge prompted many inquiries
from potential buyers, according to Sotheby’s. That led Carlson
to decide to auction it again.

Hatton said she was sure the bag would find a good home. Such
artifacts usually go through the hands of several different
owners over the years, she added.

“Just know that the kind of person that would pay money like this
for this item is going to take excellent care of it,” Hatton
said. “Nothing is lost forever.”

(Reporting by Taylor Harris; Editing by Daniel Wallis and Diane
Craft)

Read the original article on Reuters. Copyright 2017. Follow Reuters on Twitter.