iPhone 8 Adoption Expectedly Lower After First Weekend of Sales as Customers Await iPhone X

New data shows iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus adoption was lower than previous models over the first three days of availability.


During the first weekend of sales, the devices combined for an estimated 0.7 percent market share of all iPhone models, the lowest since the iPhone 5s in 2013, according to mobile engagement platform Localytics.

With an estimated 0.4 percent market share, the iPhone 8 Plus recorded higher first weekend adoption than any Plus-sized iPhone ever, as demand continues to shift towards the larger 5.5-inch smartphone.


It is important to note the data does not represent actual sales of the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, but measures users who have received the devices and started using one of the 37,000 apps integrated with the Localytics SDK.

The slow start for the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus is unsurprising, as the type of customers who would rush to purchase a new iPhone during the first weekend are likely waiting for the iPhone X to launch in November.

“Apple is betting big on the iPhone X, and so far it looks like consumers may be doing the same,” said Localytics.

Apple stopped releasing first weekend sales numbers for new iPhone models last year, as demand typically outweighs supply, so the company feels it is no longer a representative metric for investors or customers.

In years past, we’ve announced how many new iPhones had been sold as of the first weekend following launch. But as we have expanded our distribution through carriers and resellers to hundreds of thousands of locations around the world, we are now at a point where we know before taking the first customer pre-order that we will sell out of iPhone 7.

These initial sales will be governed by supply, not demand, and we have decided that it is no longer a representative metric for our investors and customers. Therefore we won’t be releasing a first-weekend number any longer.

iOS 11’s estimated 22 percent adoption is also lower than previous versions through the first six days of availability.


These numbers may or may not be completely accurate, but together with shorter lines reported at Apple retail stores on iPhone 8 launch day, there is an overall sense there will be overwhelming demand for the iPhone X.

Galaxy S8 v Apple iphone 8 – Why Apple’s new smartphone might have a single big gain about Samsung | Tech | Existence & Model

The fight of the smartphones was reignited past 7 days when Apple launched its new Apple iphone 8.

This updated device has be refreshed to involve a brighter display screen, speedier processor and enhanced cameras.

It also has a new glass layout which lets this latest Apple iphone to be charged wirelessly and Apple has additional far more memory with the basic design starting at 64GB alternatively of 32GB.

The Apple iphone 8 went on sale past Friday with a starting rate of £699 in comparison with £689 for Samsung’s Galaxy S8 – Amazon is basically providing the S8 for £519.

It might appear to be like a good plan to choose for the S8 particularly as it not only has a more cost-effective rate but also a gorgeous curved layout and AMOLED display.

Nevertheless, just before you spend your revenue it’s truly worth remembering that iPhones generally keep their worth much much better than any other smartphones.

Plainly we never know how substantially an Apple iphone 8 will be truly worth in two yrs time but a new trade-in give from Activity may possibly give us a good plan.

The substantial-road retailer has just announced a new plan which lets smartphone end users to get income or in-store credit when they offer their units and the Apple iphone however beats the rest when it comes to worth.

Activity is at the moment providing £350 for an Apple iphone 7 which was launched past calendar year.

Meanwhile a Galaxy S7 Edge, also launched past calendar year, will only get you £200 in income.

To matters worse for Samsung, even an Apple iphone 5s, launched in 2013, is truly worth £149 and a Apple iphone 6, launched in 2014, is truly worth £234.

Along with the income incentive, Activity is also providing far more if you choose for in-store credit which can be expended on the latest online games and components

This indicates you can get about £460 if you trade-in your Apple iphone 7 Additionally or £240 if you hand about your S7 Edge.

Activity usually are not the only organization which delivers far more for Apple devices with New music Magpie and Sellmymobile.com each providing far more for more mature iPhones than Galaxy units.

It is in all probability no surprise that Apple continues to keep its worth much much better than rival units and it’s definitely truly worth taking into consideration upcoming time you will need to update your smartphone.

9 reasons you should buy an iPhone 8 instead of an iPhone X

Apple announced three new iPhones this month: the iPhone 8, the iPhone 8 Plus, and the high-end iPhone X.

Those three phones start at $699, $799, and $999, respectively.

Based on the relatively diminutive launch-day lines for the iPhone 8, it seems likely that most people are waiting for the release of Apple’s high-end iPhone X, which debuts November 3.

That said, there are several reasons it’s worth considering an iPhone 8 instead of holding out for the iPhone X:

1. The iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are powered by the same brains as the iPhone X.

This is probably the most important reason to consider the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus over the iPhone X: Functionally, they’re all identical.

All of these phones are powered by Apple’s new A11 Bionic chip, a neural engine, and the M11 motion coprocessor. The only difference is how the phones use these features: The iPhone X uses the A11 chip and neural engine for its new face-detection system Face ID, which the iPhone 8 does not have.

2. Touch ID is a proven entity. Face ID is not.

Ever since the release of iPhone 5S in 2013, Touch ID has changed the way we use our phones — from unlocking the device, to storing passwords, to using our fingerprints to pay for goods via Apple Pay.

Touch ID is a known, proven entity. Face ID, which will replace Touch ID on the iPhone X, is less known.

Apple makes some bold statements about Face ID. The company claims it’s less prone to being tricked than Touch ID. They claim it can also work in the dark, or recognize changes to your face — like if you grow a beard, or wear glasses, or change your hair, or put on a kooky outfit. But we still don’t know how Face ID will actually work in the wild when millions of people are using it. Simply put, technology is not infallible, and it’s impossible to predict what could go wrong with this unlocking method. (Thankfully, the passcode backup still exists.)

By choosing an iPhone 8, however, you choose to forgo the guinea-pig era for Face ID.

3. The iPhone 8 and 8 Plus support fast charging and wireless charging for the first time — just like the iPhone X.

2.png

(Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

All of these phones support the Qi wireless charging standard as well as fast-charging.

The downside is, you’ll have to buy extra accessories if you choose either new charging method. Apple offers several different Qi wireless charging pads you can buy (its own AirPower solution won’t be out until 2018, unfortunately), and you’ll need to buy anywhere from $25 to $75 worth of equipment — a Lightning-to-USB-C cable and a USB-C Power Delivery-compatible charger, specifically — if you want to use fast-charging for your iPhone 8, 8 Plus, or iPhone X.

Again, this is one more expense to consider when thinking about the iPhone 8 versus the $1,000-to-start iPhone X.

4. The iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X have nearly-identical rear cameras.

If you care at all about photography, the rear cameras on the iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X are nearly identical. The iPhone 8 is also a great shooter, but the larger 8 Plus adds a second telephoto lens so you can zoom in without losing image quality.

The only difference between the rear cameras on the iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X is that the iPhone X has optical-image stabilization for both the wide-angle and telephoto lenses, for sharper images, especially in low-light settings; the iPhone 8 Plus only has OIS for the wide-angle lens, like the iPhone 7 Plus before it.

5. The front-facing cameras on the iPhone 8 and iPhone X are also identical — save for a few extra features.

On paper, the FaceTime HD cameras of the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are functionally identical to the front-facing camera inside the iPhone X’s TrueDepth camera system. All of these phones take 7-megapixel photos, have a ƒ/2.2 aperture, and film video in 1080p.

The only difference is the iPhone X got a few “exclusive” software camera features: Portrait Mode on the front-facing camera (in addition to the back); Portrait Lighting, which lets you remove backgrounds in your selfies for a dramatic effect; and Animoji, where you can send animated emoji to your friends that mimic your facial expressions and even speak using your voice.

6. The iPhone 8 doesn’t have that hideous “notch” at the top of the phone.

The TrueDepth camera system on the iPhone X is the lone interruption on that phone’s edge-to-edge display. The “notch,” as many are calling it, is pretty hideous, unfortunately.

Thankfully, there’s no notch on the iPhone 8 or 8 Plus.

7. The iPhone X is more expensive than the iPhone 8.

istock-638338292.jpg

(iStock / Petar Chernaev )

The iPhone 8 starts at $700, while the larger iPhone 8 Plus starts at $800. 

The iPhone X, on the other hand, starts at $1,000.

It’s simple math: You can save at least $200 by going with an iPhone 8, which, keep in mind, is still a brand-new phone from Apple.

8. If you’re upgrading from an iPhone 7 or iPhone 7 Plus, your old cases will fit.

The iPhone 8 and 8 Plus have near-identical dimensions to their predecessors, the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, respectively. The new phones are slightly heavier, and there are slight differences in the new phones’ height, length and depth, but all of the differences are less than a millimeter each, which means your old iPhone 7 cases will still fit.

The iPhone X has completely different dimensions from past iPhones, so your old cases won’t work with this phone — one more expense to consider when buying this already-expensive phone.

9. You’ll actually be able to find it.

Since everyone is so focused on the iPhone X, the iPhone 8 is actually easy to find and buy — even today! Meanwhile, iPhone X will likely be in high demand and short supply, meaning lots of people will probably be waiting weeks and months for their phones to arrive while you’re sitting pretty with your iPhone 8, which has arguably all of the biggest advantages of the iPhone X, with a more reasonable price tag.

Read more:

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• The 2 worst mistakes you could make in a job interview, according to an ex-Apple recruiter
• This is why narcissists are so cruel to the people they date
• Inside the daily routine of billionaire Bill Gates

Read the original article on Business Insider UK. © 2017. Follow Business Insider UK on Twitter.

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iPhone 8 Vs. Galaxy Note 8 Drop Test Shows Samsung Flagship Triumphant

iPhone 8 and Galaxy Note 8

The ongoing debate between Apple and Samsung might never be settled—some people prefer iPhone handsets and iOS, others are big time fans of Galaxy devices and Android. Each side has their pros and cons, though if you purchased a Galaxy Note 8 and are looking for bragging rights over the iPhone 8, you can point to durability. After putting both hands through a series of drop tests, the folks at PhoneBuff found Samsung’s handset to be the tougher of the two…barely.

What makes this face off interesting is that both the iPhone 8 and Galaxy Note 8 are using an all-glass back design. Samsung has actually been using glass backs for quite some time now, while Apple introduced it as a highly touted feature of the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus (and iPhone X)—it is the first time since 2011 that Apple has gone with an all-glass design, and this current implementation is supposedly the bees-knees. Or in Apple-speak, it is using “the most durable glass ever in a smartphone, front and back.”

That is a bold claim, but how does it hold up to the competition? The iPhone 8 is a tough cookie. However, it is not quite as tough as the Galaxy Note 8.

Both devices survived a drop test onto a slab of concrete, with the backside landing first. The phones functioned just fine afterward, though the glass back on both handsets was noticeably cracked—the Galaxy Note 8’s damage looked a little more severe, particularly in the upper corner, while the iPhone 8 had more cracks overall.

This was followed up by a corner-drop test, which in previous generations might have resulted in the entire phone being cracked. In this case, both handsets performed surprisingly well, with minimal damage on the corners that took the brunt of the drop test. And other than some minor scuffing, both phones still functioned properly.

iPhone 8 Cracked

Where the Galaxy Note 8 started to distance itself from the iPhone 8 was when dropping the handsets face-first. Both phones sustained damage, but it was far less prominent on the Galaxy Note 8, which was able to contain the damage to the corners. On the iPhone 8, more of the main display was cracked. While both phones were still functional, the iPhone 8 presented the higher risk of injury to finger cuts.

Drop Test Score

The final drop test consisted of raising the height and letting the phones plummet onto a piece of steel, and then repeating the test through 10 rounds. This is where the Galaxy Note 8 was really able to claim victory. As you might imagine, both phones took a beating here. However, chunks of the iPhone 8 actually flew off the device after a few drop tests. And after eight drops, the iPhone 8 no longer functioned properly, whereas the Galaxy Note 8 survived all 10 drops.

So what’s the takeaway here? Well, buy yourself a case for your handset. Beyond that, Galaxy Note 8 owners can enjoy a small amount of bragging rights over iPhone 8 owners in terms of durability. In all fairness to Apple (and iPhone fans), the iPhone 8 actually performed fairly well overall. However, the device’s glass is certainly not immune from cracking, hence why a display replacement will still run customers $29 and glass back $99 on Apple’s AppleCare+ program.

Thumbnail and Article Images Source: YouTube via PhoneBuff

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Samsung Galaxy Note 8 vs. OnePlus 5: Which One Is Better?

The Samsung Galaxy Note 8 met its release date on September 15 and started shipping soon after. Based on its dynamic and futuristic design, a great selection of different and visionary features, high-end performance and much more, we will all agree that it atoned for last year’s recall. On the other hand, we can’t help but admire the OnePlus 5. It wasn’t as successful as its predecessor, the OnePlus 3. However, it still features a magnificent design and powerful functions. Both Android-based phones were greatly anticipated, which brings us to the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 vs. OnePlus 5 duel. Continue reading to learn more about these two Android phones.

Samsung Galaxy Note 8 Blue
Image: Samsung / Flickr

Design

The OnePlus 5 design doesn’t significantly differ from that of its predecessors. The fingerprint sensor is located on the front of the smartphone, just like on the OnePlus 3. The rear is curved, and the 3D Gorilla Glass 5 made its appearance. Still, the phone is nearly feather-light at 153 grams.

On the other hand, the innovation of the Galaxy Note 8 exceeds the reality. Although it resembles the S8’s standard appearance, it tells an entirely different story. The gorgeous Infinity Display takes almost the whole front side, while the little silver bezel flatters the rest of the front. The Samsung Galaxy Note 8 wasn’t spared the trend of ditching the Home Button. Still, it looks mesmerizing, although it is slightly heavier than the OnePlus 5 at 195 grams.

The Samsung Galaxy Note 8 takes the reward for innovative design. However, the portability of the OnePlus 5 makes it more user-friendly.

Screen

The Samsung Galaxy Note 8 sports a 6.3-inch display, while the OnePlus 5 features a 5.5-inch display. If the screen size is something that matters when choosing a phone, the Note 8 beats OnePlus 5 in size.

Both phones feature AMOLED displays. However, it is noticeable that the Note 8 screen has more color vibrancy than the OnePlus 5’s. The Note 8 is more pixel-rich as well, and the QHD+ panel and 1440 x 2960 pixel resolution fit well in the Note 8 profile.

On the other hand, although the OnePlus 5’s 1080 x 1920 resolution is nowhere near the Note 8’s, it still manages to show a sharp and clear image, while the Note 8’s image sharpness is essential for VR functionality.

Performance

The Samsung Galaxy Note 8 is currently the company’s fastest smartphone. It is equipped with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 chip and Samsung Exynos 8895 processor, and with 6 GB of RAM, the phone is sure to never lag.

The OnePlus 5, just like the Note 8, uses the Snapdragon 835 SoC. Buyers can choose between the 6 GB and 8 GB options. However, the 8 GB option isn’t going to make much of a difference in performance, considering the amazing configuration of the Samsung Galaxy Note 8. Both phones perform outstandingly and are likely not going to fall behind.

Camera

The Samsung Galaxy Note 8 features a dual-lens camera on its rear for the first time. One is a telephoto lens, and the other is a wide-angle lens. It doesn’t hurt to mention that the latter is the same as the one on its sibling, the Galaxy S8. The most-anticipated feature of the camera is optical image stabilization, which prevents camera shake. Both cameras also have 12-megapixel sensors. The 2x optical zoom is fantastic, and more importantly, the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 camera improves 4K video quality and OIS.

The OnePlus 5’s camera is similar to that of the Note 8. In fact, it features a dual-lens camera too. However, the optical sensors are different. The wide-angle camera sports 16 megapixels, while the telephoto lens can go as high as 20 megapixels.

Even though one of the lenses of the OnePlus 5’s camera has more megapixels, it doesn’t necessarily mean the camera is better overall. The Note 8 has a larger aperture when it comes to its telephoto lens, which is clearly an advantage compared to the OnePlus 5.

Both cameras are great. Still, this duel of the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 vs. OnePlus 5 is in favor of The Note 8.

Wrapping Up

When it comes up to the features, the Samsung Galaxy Note 8, as expected, has a great variety of functions and features. Unlike the OnePlus 5, the Galaxy Note 8 offers some wonderful bells and whistles, including the recognizable Samsung S-Pen, IP68 water and dust resistance, and the iris scanner. Wireless charging makes its appearance just like it did in the Galaxy S8, and the Note 8 offers DeX support.

While there is a clearly stated lack of features in the OnePlus 5, its innovative Dash Charging will appeal to everyone who likes to have their phone’s battery full in no time. Another highlight of the OnePlus 5 is that it is considerably more affordable, starting at $479 for its 64GB/6GB model, while the Galaxy Note 8 has a starting price of $929.99.

So, which is the winner in the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 vs. OnePlus 5 competition? The Note 8 takes the award for its innovative, impeccable screen and a lot of great features while the OnePlus 5 offers consistency and will appeal to users restricted on a budget.

Samsung Galaxy Note 8 vs. OnePlus 5: Which one is better in your opinion?

Reasons you should buy an iPhone 8 instead of an iPhone X

iPhone 8 and 8 plusHollis Johnson/Business InsiderApple announced three new iPhones this month: the iPhone 8, the iPhone 8 Plus, and the high-end iPhone X.

Those three phones start at $699, $799, and $999, respectively.

Based on the relatively diminutive launch-day lines for the iPhone 8, it seems likely that most people are waiting for the release of Apple’s high-end iPhone X, which debuts November 3.

That said, there are several reasons it’s worth considering an iPhone 8 instead of holding out for the iPhone X:


1. The iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are powered by the same brains as the iPhone X.

1. The iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are powered by the same brains as the iPhone X.

Apple

This is probably the most important reason to consider the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus over the iPhone X: Functionally, they’re all identical.

All of these phones are powered by Apple’s new A11 Bionic chip, a neural engine, and the M11 motion coprocessor. The only difference is how the phones use these features: The iPhone X uses the A11 chip and neural engine for its new face-detection system Face ID, which the iPhone 8 does not have.

2. Touch ID is a proven entity. Face ID is not.

2. Touch ID is a proven entity. Face ID is not.

Apple

Ever since the release of iPhone 5S in 2013, Touch ID has changed the way we use our phones — from unlocking the device, to storing passwords, to using our fingerprints to pay for goods via Apple Pay.

Touch ID is a known, proven entity. Face ID, which will replace Touch ID on the iPhone X, is less known.

Apple makes some bold statements about Face ID. The company claims it’s less prone to being tricked than Touch ID. They claim it can also work in the dark, or recognize changes to your face — like if you grow a beard, or wear glasses, or change your hair, or put on a kooky outfit. But we still don’t know how Face ID will actually work in the wild when millions of people are using it. Simply put, technology is not infallible, and it’s impossible to predict what could go wrong with this unlocking method. (Thankfully, the passcode backup still exists.)

By choosing an iPhone 8, however, you choose to forgo the guinea-pig era for Face ID.

3. The iPhone 8 and 8 Plus support fast charging and wireless charging for the first time — just like the iPhone X.

3. The iPhone 8 and 8 Plus support fast charging and wireless charging for the first time — just like the iPhone X.

Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

All of these phones support the Qi wireless charging standard as well as fast-charging.

The downside is, you’ll have to buy extra accessories if you choose either new charging method. Apple offers several different Qi wireless charging pads you can buy (its own AirPower solution won’t be out until 2018, unfortunately), and you’ll need to buy anywhere from $25 to $75 worth of equipment — a Lightning-to-USB-C cable and a USB-C Power Delivery-compatible charger, specifically — if you want to use fast-charging for your iPhone 8, 8 Plus, or iPhone X.

Again, this is one more expense to consider when thinking about the iPhone 8 versus the $1,000-to-start iPhone X.

4. The iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X have nearly-identical rear cameras.

4. The iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X have nearly-identical rear cameras.

Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

If you care at all about photography, the rear cameras on the iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X are nearly identical. The iPhone 8 is also a great shooter, but the larger 8 Plus adds a second telephoto lens so you can zoom in without losing image quality.

The only difference between the rear cameras on the iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X is that the iPhone X has optical-image stabilization for both the wide-angle and telephoto lenses, for sharper images, especially in low-light settings; the iPhone 8 Plus only has OIS for the wide-angle lens, like the iPhone 7 Plus before it.

5. The front-facing cameras on the iPhone 8 and iPhone X are also identical — save for a few extra features.

5. The front-facing cameras on the iPhone 8 and iPhone X are also identical — save for a few extra features.

Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

On paper, the FaceTime HD cameras of the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are functionally identical to the front-facing camera inside the iPhone X’s TrueDepth camera system. All of these phones take 7-megapixel photos, have a ƒ/2.2 aperture, and film video in 1080p.

The only difference is the iPhone X got a few “exclusive” software camera features: Portrait Mode on the front-facing camera (in addition to the back); Portrait Lighting, which lets you remove backgrounds in your selfies for a dramatic effect; and Animoji, where you can send animated emoji to your friends that mimic your facial expressions and even speak using your voice.

6. The iPhone 8 doesn’t have that hideous “notch” at the top of the phone.

Apple

The TrueDepth camera system on the iPhone X is the lone interruption on that phone’s edge-to-edge display. The “notch,” as many are calling it, is pretty hideous, unfortunately.

Thankfully, there’s no notch on the iPhone 8 or 8 Plus.

7. The iPhone X is more expensive than the iPhone 8.

7. The iPhone X is more expensive than the iPhone 8.

Apple

The iPhone 8 starts at $700, while the larger iPhone 8 Plus starts at $800. 

The iPhone X, on the other hand, starts at $1,000.

It’s simple math: You can save at least $200 by going with an iPhone 8, which, keep in mind, is still a brand-new phone from Apple.

8. If you’re upgrading from an iPhone 7 or iPhone 7 Plus, your old cases will fit.

8. If you're upgrading from an iPhone 7 or iPhone 7 Plus, your old cases will fit.

Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

The iPhone 8 and 8 Plus have near-identical dimensions to their predecessors, the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, respectively. The new phones are slightly heavier, and there are slight differences in the new phones’ height, length and depth, but all of the differences are less than a millimeter each, which means your old iPhone 7 cases will still fit.

The iPhone X has completely different dimensions from past iPhones, so your old cases won’t work with this phone — one more expense to consider when buying this already-expensive phone.

9. You’ll actually be able to find it.

9. You'll actually be able to find it.

A customer being handed over her new iPhone 8. She said she didn’t need the iPhone X.Edoardo Maggio/Business Insider

Since everyone is so focused on the iPhone X, the iPhone 8 is actually easy to find and buy — even today! Meanwhile, iPhone X will likely be in high demand and short supply, meaning lots of people will probably be waiting weeks and months for their phones to arrive while you’re sitting pretty with your iPhone 8, which has arguably all of the biggest advantages of the iPhone X, with a more reasonable price tag.

This week’s top stories: iPhone 8, Apple Watch Series 3, and Apple TV 4K reviews, iOS 11 is here, and more

In this week’s top stories: The iPhone 8, Apple Watch Series 3, and Apple TV 4K are now available and we go hands-on with it all, Apple officially release iOS 11, the iPhone X launch looms, and much more. Read on for it all…

Spigen TEKA RA200 Airpods Earhooks Cover

Following Apple’s first event at Steve Jobs Theater last week, it this week released a trio of new products: the iPhone 8, Apple Watch Series 3, and Apple TV 4K are now readily available to consumers. We had the opportunity to hands on with all three.

In our iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus review we noted of the similarities and differences compared to the iPhone 7 and asked whether or not it was worth waiting for the iPhone X. Meanwhile, our Apple Watch Series 3 review highlighted the iPhone freedom that LTE connectivity provides, though some app limitations hold it back.

The Apple TV 4K also packs a new, slightly revised Siri Remote alongside performance improvements 4K HDR support, and more.

Elsewhere, a multitude of apps were updated with support for new iOS 11 features such as the Files app, Drag and Drop, and ARKit. Most notably, Ikea released its new augmented reality app, Ikea Place.

The iPhone X launch, however, is still the cloud hanging above all of this week’s releases. The device has reportedly suffered another production delay which could further hinder supply when it’s released next month.

Head below for all of this week’s top stories.

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After the iPhone 8 launch, the iPhone X might be Apple’s peak (AAPL) — Quartz

When a new iPhone is available to pick up in stores, we usually see photos of lines stretching blocks long, as customers around the world proudly walk out with their shiny new rectangles. But today, as the iPhone 8, 8 Plus, and Apple Watch Series 3 hit the shelves, the usual lines were few and far between. While some stores—sorry, “Town Squares”—had large lines, some had none at all, The Verge reported.

In London, Apple staff reportedly outnumbered iPhone customers. And when I went to check out an Apple store close to Quartz’s office, I found about a dozen people waiting, and about as many security guards waiting to corral a crowd that clearly was not there. It was a few hours after the store had opened, and an Apple employee told me they still had new-model phones in stock.

These lackluster openings follow a week of mixed-bag reviews of Apple’s latest products. Most reviewers had generally positive things to say about the iPhone 8, even though the upgrades are minimal. But nearly all of them recommended waiting for the iPhone X: The mostly-screen iPhone was announced alongside the iPhone 8 at Apple’s event earlier this month, but will not be available for preorder until the end of October, most likely due to supply constraints.

There were also mixed reviews for the new Apple Watch, as some reviewers struggled with connectivity issues on the new built-in LTE cellular chip. While many enjoyed how fast the new watch was, others pointed out that little had changed in the watch’s design or functionality since it was first announced four years ago.

There were yet more concerns about the other product that debuted this week, the Apple TV 4K, with some reviewers questioning the price of the streaming device (more than double the price of similar offerings from Google and Roku). Others reported quality issues in the way it processes HD videos.

In all, it’s a far cry from the usual frenzy surrounding an Apple launch day, with products getting very down-to-earth scores from all but the most ardent Apple fans, and sensibly short lines of buyers.

Apple’s stock has been on a slide since it took the wraps off its newest products on Sept. 12. MarketWatch reported that Apple’s stock price fell by the greatest percentage of any launch day since the iPhone was first released 10 years ago.

While it’s entirely possible that everything will feel different in a month when the iPhone X comes out, perhaps we’ve hit a saturation point with Apple products as they are. Apple has been criticized in recent years for releasing iterative updates of its most popular products. The iPhones 6, 6S, 7, and now 8 all look almost identical. The three versions of the Apple Watch have been the same. New MacBooks have been criticized for adding functions no one wanted (has anyone found a real use for the Touch Bar yet?), and for removing keys and ports that users like.

Google and Amazon made great voice-activated speakers, so Apple must. Samsung put LTE in a watch, so Apple must. Microsoft made a tablet with a stylus and removable keyboard, so Apple must. Apple used to sell one (and then two) models of smartphone: It now has eight different models, in different sizes and prices, to purchase. And when they’re on the tables in Apple’s stores, it’s nearly impossible to tell most of them apart. I asked a clerk if they had the 8 in stock yet, and it turned out I was looking at them.

It’s no longer clear why there are now so many phones for sale, or which iPad is right for which consumer, or even who the new Apple Watch is for. As Business Insider’s Kif Leswing put it when describing the Apple watch’s LTE woes: “Consumers don’t buy the potential of a product—they buy it to do a specific job today.”

Apple is about to release a phone that starts at $1,000. It raised the price on a range of other products this month, and upped the starting price of the iPhone 8 by $50 over what the 7 cost a year ago. Its second-largest business is now revenue generated off of app downloads, music and movies. While there’s no indication that Apple will continue to be anything other than a moneymaking behemoth for a long time yet, price increases and service sales do not give the appearance of a company that is brimming with new ideas.

The most impressive thing the company has shown off in 2017, the year that was supposed to be its most impressive in a decade, was a $5 billion campus. Much like everything else the company released this year, the campus seemed to favor form over functionality.

Apple’s pristine cathedral of metal, glass, and marble, will be around for decades. But will we be speaking about its occupants in the present tense, or the past?


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How the iPhone 8 could end up hurting the Apple and the iPhone X

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Today’s retail launch of the Apple iPhone 8 and 8 Plus is a crucial test for Apple’s riskiest iPhone strategy.

For the first time, Apple introduced its latest iPhone upgrades while simultaneously teasing something better coming soon — what, by Apple’s own admission, is “the future.”

Apple’s iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are, based on my review and what I’ve seen elsewhere on the web (and even in teardowns), “S” series devices in full-number-update clothing. Except for the glass back, the handsets maintain the iPhone 6 design introduced in 2014. Apple swapped out the A10 Fusion chip for the incredibly powerful A11 Bionic CPU, but left the screen and cameras largely unchanged.

I really like the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus, but the changes come directly from Apple’s “S” playbook.

There’s nothing wrong with any of this, and I really like the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus, but the changes come directly from Apple’s “S” playbook: Upgrades instead of an overhaul, so the number stays the same to signal the subtler nature of the changes.

Instead of delivering the iPhone 7S (and 7S Plus), though, Apple gave them the full-number update treatment and simultaneously introduced the iPhone X (which, to remind, is pronounced “ten”). With its aggressive redesign and cutting-edge technology like the TrueDepth camera module, edge-to-edge OLED display and retirement of the home button, the iPhone X earns the name. It’s the true apex iPhone and easily the most coveted product in Apple’s iPhone lineup.

On Friday, the day Apple put the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus on sale in retail stores (after a few days of online store pre-sales) I started reading reports of sparse crowds at Apple Stores. In London, there were more Apple employees in the store than queued up iPhone 8 buyers, and it appears to be a very similar picture in the U.S. To be fair, iPhone retail launch events have been in decline since the iPhone 6 launch.

At the same time, I launched a little online poll:

People want the X.

People want the X.

Granted the results aren’t exactly scientific, but the sentiment is clear: More than half the people responding are sitting on their hands and waiting until the sexier iPhone X ships in November, even after numerous reports said supplies could be so low that some people won’t get the smartphone until next year. 

What if, I wondered, Apple made a terrible mistake?

This strategy of offering the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus first, while the real update, one that some believe is prohibitively expensive, looms just a few weeks later, is an unusual choice. In fact, it could squeeze Apple from both sides. iPhone consumers usually want the shiniest, new thing, but they don’t want to pay an arm and a leg (The argument could be made they they’ve been doing so for ages, but the loss of carrier subsidies and the psychographic impact of a $1,000 price should not be underestimated).

Could iPhone consumers feel caught in the middle between the phone they really want, but can’t afford, and the more reasonably priced device that doesn’t excite them because it’s not Apple’s ultimate iPhone?

Looked at this way, this bold iPhone strategy could be Apple CEO Tim Cook’s first big misstep… or another stroke of brilliance.

One iPhone for all

Ten years ago, we had one iPhone to choose from. Even as Android competitors started introducing a wider array of handsets and the early, large-screen devices that, at the time, few (certainly not Steve Jobs) believed would be successful, Apple maintained its one (small-screen) handset strategy

That strategy persisted until 2013, when Tim Cook unveiled the iPhone 5C alongside the iPhone 5S. Suddenly, Apple’s new phone lineup doubled in size. It set the stage for the company’s first big-screen iPhone, the 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus, which launched in 2014 next to the 4.7-inch iPhone 6. 

Personally, I loved this shift. It acknowledged changing smartphone tastes and started to give people design and price options. 

Today, we have a lineup of eight iPhones that range in price from the $349, 4-inch, iPhone SE to the $999, 5.8-inch, iPhone X. There’s a lot of choice in there and I have no doubt that consumers welcome this. However, the core iPhone user, the person who bought the first iPhone as a status symbol and has upgraded like clockwork to every new device each year is possibly facing a dilemma.

This bold iPhone strategy could be Apple CEO Tim Cook’s first big misstep…or another stroke of brilliance.

If they bought the iPhone 7 last year, are they planning on buying the iPhone 8? Probably not. It certainly wasn’t my recommendation. So that means they wait for the iPhone X.

As Mashable Senior Tech Analyst Raymond Wong pointed out to me: This is potentially a “win-win” for Apple. Consumers who don’t buy the cheaper iPhone 8 or 8 Plus, will just wait for the expensive iPhone X.

He may be right, but what if anemic iPhone X supplies in 2017 mean that most people are waiting or buying their iPhone X in 2018?

“So what?” you might respond. Apple still makes the money, right?

Yes, but what does the Apple’s first quarter look like if demand for the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus is low (we have yet to hear about pre-sale numbers, but there have been zero reports of delivery delays on pre-sales, a possible sign of soft demand) and tens of millions of customers wait for iPhone X in 2018?

Apple’s first quarter, the one that includes holiday sales, has looked amazing for almost a decade precisely because of the iPhone, which sells anywhere from 40 to 75 million units in the first three months after launch. Those sales are driven by the Apple’s hottest new device and, in this situation, that isn’t the iPhone 8.

Things could still work out in Apple’s favor, especially if they just collect all the pre-orders for the iPhone X, put those sales on the 2017 Q1 books and then let people wait for delivery until next year when they can make enough of the 5.8-inch handsets.

Alternatively, Apple could benefit from the unusually high number of upgraders ready to buy new phones. Samsung told me earlier this year that some 50 million consumers were at the end of the 18-month smartphone ownership cycle. They hope to sweep a lot of them up in the Galaxy S8/S8+ and Note 8 launches. But they’re up for grabs for Apple, too, which could sell them any one of eight different iPhones.

I’m confident Apple will sell millions of new iPhones, but if most them end up being the iPhone X, the question of when those sales happen starts to look really murky. Will they still be meaningful if many happen after the Samsung Galaxy S9 is a reality? Or iPhone 11/iPhone X2 rumors start to mount?

How the world — and Apple’s customers — respond to a protracted iPhone X launch is anyone’s guess.

Watch: Secrets of the Steve Jobs Theater

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Samsung Galaxy Note 8 full review: top-of-the-line specs and great dual-lens camera – but how much do you need them?

When Samsung introduced the first Galaxy Note handset in 2011, it was mocked by reporters for its (at the time) overly large 5.3-inch display and its stylus – the latter something Steve Jobs had dismissed as outdated when he unveiled the first iPhone. But the Note ended up being a huge hit with consumers, effectively starting the “phablet” trend that peaked between 2014 and 2016. Even Apple would eventually back away from Job’s declaration by releasing a stylus for the iPad.

Samsung found itself in a bind over what to do with the Note this year, and not just because it has to rebound from last year’s fiasco of exploding Note 7 batteries.

The question facing the Note 8 was how it would maintain its phablet identity when the recent trend of shrinking screen bezels and changing display aspect ratios has effectively killed giant phones. Every important release in 2017, from the iPhone X to the LG V30 to the Xiaomi Mi Mix 2, is smaller than last year’s counterpart. Would the Note 8 go the same route?

First impressions of Samsung Galaxy Note 8 – a formidable phablet with giant memory and fun camera features

Not quite, but the Note designers’ “go bigger” mentality has clearly been compromised. While the Note 8 is slightly larger than the Note 7, it is barely any bigger than the Galaxy S8+ smartphone released earlier this year. This is the first time in Samsung’s history that a Note device doesn’t tower over its S counterpart. In fact, as noted in our first look, the Note 8 is essentially an S8+ with a stylus. Will this be enough to satisfy consumers?

Design and hardware

The Note 8, just like the S8+, has a gorgeous AMOLED Quad HD panel with an unusually long 18.5:9 aspect ratio; the screen takes up the entire front of the device except for a slim forehead and chin. The Note 8’s screen is slightly larger than that of the S8+ (6.3 inches versus 6.2 inches), but otherwise the two phones’ fronts look identical.

It’s the first Samsung handset with dual cameras, and Samsung’s set-up is very similar to Apple’s – one lens is a “normal” lens, while the second is a “telephoto” shooter that offers a more close-up image.

At the bottom of the device is a slot for the stylus, officially named the S Pen. The stylus is made of plastic and feels a bit flimsy, but the 0.7mm tip is fine enough for a superior annotating experience.

Software and features

The Note 8 is powered by a Snapdragon 835 processor in Hong Kong, China, and the United States. The rest of the world gets Samsung’s own Exynos 8895 chip set (this is due to some American and Chinese mobile carriers using CDMA bands). Both chipsets perform similarly and are among the most powerful on the market. RAM has been upgraded to 6GB from the Galaxy S8’s 4GB.

The Note 8 runs Android 7.1.1 with Samsung’s own software skin on top. The UI is almost identical to what’s found on the Galaxy S8, except for additional S Pen features.

The Note 8 reacts as soon as the stylus is removed from its slot. When the screen is off, the phone goes into “screen off memo”, which allows the user to jot down notes that can be pinned to the Always On Display so they become a constant reminder.

If the S Pen is pulled out while the phone is in action, a floating S Pen menu takes over the screen, offering a host of features ranging from text translation (simply hover the stylus over a string of words) to screen memo, or “live message”, which lets users create an animated GIF of their writing/drawing, which can then be sent through most chat services.

Premium smartphone battle heats up with Apple event, new LG flagship’s release

This all sounds really cool in theory, but almost all of those features can be done on another phone with your finger. Samsung has spent years trying to make the S Pen seem like a necessity for most, but at the end of the day the stylus is only crucial if you annotate documents or sign virtual contracts often.

Moving back to Samsung’s Android skin, I am not a fan. To Samsung’s credit, it has cleaned up the UI a lot since its early days when the software was widely mocked, but there are still too many things that are not intuitive.

Bringing up the app drawer in stock Android, for example, is done by swiping up from the dock. Once the drawer has been pulled up, users can continue scrolling vertically with their thumbs to cycle through the rows of apps.

Samsung’s app tray is also triggered by swiping up, but once the drawer is available you have to scroll horizontally to browse through apps. Why? This is change for the sake of change that sacrifices the fluid up-and-down motion carefully designed by Google’s software engineers. Samsung’s UI is full of annoying things like this.

The good news is that Android devices, unlike iPhones, are highly customisable, so I was able to replace Samsung’s UI with Nova Launcher, whose aesthetics and behaviour is more in line with stock Android.

Performance and battery life

Performance has been smooth throughout my week of testing, but Samsung devices are known to become laggy after a few months of use due to that heavy-handed software (my Galaxy S8 is suffering from that now). That AMOLED display is a stunner to look at, as usual, but the single speaker grille at the bottom is weak, especially for a phone with this price tag.

Face-off: which smartphone takes the best photos – Samsung Galaxy S8+ or Huawei P10 Plus? Our photo editor’s verdict

The main 12-megapixel camera of the Note 8 is excellent; it is fast to focus and is probably the second best low-light shooter on the market right now behind the LG V30. But that second telephoto lens is a bit disappointing. I conducted dozens of test shots comparing the Note 8’s dedicated 2X zoom with the supposedly inferior digital 2X zoom of the LG V30, and the Note 8’s images did not appear more clear or detailed, even when viewing the photos in full size on a 32-inch monitor.

The second lens is much more useful when applying the artificial depth-of-field effect (aka bokeh) that almost every phone has tried to do in 2017. Samsung’s take, which the company calls “Live Focus”, can pump out some impressive portraits, but then so can the iPhone 7 Plus, OnePlus 5 and Huawei P10.

Moving on to the area that no doubt gave Samsung engineers some headaches: the battery. The engineers obviously didn’t want to push the battery limits too much, which explains the smaller than usual 3,300 mAh cell packed inside. Unfortunately, that means battery life is below average. In my week of use, the phone never once made it through an entire day without needing a top-up.

Conclusion

The Galaxy Note 8 is a beautifully crafted handset with top-of-the-line specs, but unless you really need the stylus it’s hard to recommend this over the Galaxy S8+, considering the Note 8 costs significantly more (HK$6,998 [US$897] for the cheapest configuration) than the S8+ (which can be had now for HK$5,000).

Specifications

Dimensions: 162.5 x 74.8 x 8.6mm

Weight: 195 grams

Display: 6.3-inch 1440 X 2960 (Quad HD) AMOLED panel

Battery: 3,300mAh

OS (version reviewed): Samsung Experience 8.5 on top of Android 7.1.1

Processor: Snapdragon 835 or Exynos 8895

Cameras: 12-megapixel main lens with f/1.7 aperture and 12-megapixel “telephoto” lens with f/2.4 aperture (rear); 8-megapixel f/1.7 front-facing camera

Memory: 64/128/256GB ROM; 6GB RAM

Colours: black, blue, grey