NVIDIA Corp. Reportedly Prepping GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — The Motley Fool

In May 2016, graphics chip specialist NVIDIA (NASDAQ:NVDA) began rolling gaming-oriented graphics processors based on its then-new Pascal architecture. The first products out of the chute were the GeForce GTX 1070 and its more powerful sibling, the GeForce GTX 1080, targeted at the high-end of the personal computer gaming market.

These processors were notable because they delivered substantial improvements in performance and power efficiency over their predecessors, thanks to the use of a new manufacturing technology, as well as significant design work on NVIDIA’s part. 

Since then, NVIDIA has released additional gaming products based on its Pascal architecture, including lower-power, lower-cost GPUs like the GeForce GTX 1060 and GeForce GTX 1050, and higher-end offerings like the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and the brawny Titan Xp for gamers willing to spend big bucks for the best possible performance.

The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti.

Image source: NVIDIA.

GPUs based on the Pascal architecture have been hugely successful for NVIDIA, helping to power significant growth in both the company’s gaming business and its booming data center accelerator business.

Per rumors from MyDrivers and Baidu, spotted by graphics card-oriented news website VideoCardz, NVIDIA is preparing a new Pascal-based graphics processor for the gaming market, to be called the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

Slotting in between the 1070 and 1080

NVIDIA’s MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 is $379 (though good luck finding one at this price, thanks to the cryptocurrency mining boom, which has dramatically increased demand for the GTX 1070, as well as other graphics processors). The GeForce GTX 1080’s MSRP sits $120 higher at $499.

Based on NVIDIA’s traditional naming scheme, the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti should be a higher-end product than the GeForce GTX 1070 but would sit lower than the GeForce GTX 1080 on both pricing and performance.

How might NVIDIA price the 1070 Ti?

I see two possible scenarios with respect to the potential MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — assuming, of course, that it’s real and comes to market.

First, it could simply sit smack-dab in the middle of the GeForce GTX 1070 and GeForce GTX 1080 on the pricing table at around $439. The purpose of a GPU at that price would be to try to upsell potential GeForce GTX 1070 buyers who aren’t quite ready to drop the cash required on the GeForce GTX 1080.

That could work, but the added revenue from those upsells could be offset if some potential GeForce GTX 1080 buyers opted to go down a notch to the new GPU, saving some money with a product that’s “close enough” in performance.

Another possibility — and, frankly, it’s one that I think is more sensible — would be that NVIDIA would drop pricing on the GeForce GTX 1070, then slot in the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti at the about the price point that earlier product previously occupied.

Such a move would have the effect of increasing the performance-per-dollar of some of its offerings, potentially stimulating demand during the holiday season (which, not-so-coincidentally, is when several high-profile PC games are set to launch).

Ashraf Eassa has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends NVIDIA. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

NVIDIA Corp. Reportedly Prepping GeForce GTX 1070 Ti | Business Markets and Stocks News

In May 2016, graphics chip specialist NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) began rolling gaming-oriented graphics processors based on its then-new Pascal architecture. The first products out of the chute were the GeForce GTX 1070 and its more powerful sibling, the GeForce GTX 1080, targeted at the high-end of the personal computer gaming market.

These processors were notable because they delivered substantial improvements in performance and power efficiency over their predecessors, thanks to the use of a new manufacturing technology, as well as significant design work on NVIDIA’s part. 

Since then, NVIDIA has released additional gaming products based on its Pascal architecture, including lower-power, lower-cost GPUs like the GeForce GTX 1060 and GeForce GTX 1050, and higher-end offerings like the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and the brawny Titan Xp for gamers willing to spend big bucks for the best possible performance.

GPUs based on the Pascal architecture have been hugely successful for NVIDIA, helping to power significant growth in both the company’s gaming business and its booming data center accelerator business.

Per rumors from MyDrivers and Baidu, spotted by graphics card-oriented news website VideoCardz, NVIDIA is preparing a new Pascal-based graphics processor for the gaming market, to be called the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

Slotting in between the 1070 and 1080

NVIDIA’s MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 is $379 (though good luck finding one at this price, thanks to the cryptocurrency mining boom, which has dramatically increased demand for the GTX 1070, as well as other graphics processors). The GeForce GTX 1080’s MSRP sits $120 higher at $499.

Based on NVIDIA’s traditional naming scheme, the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti should be a higher-end product than the GeForce GTX 1070 but would sit lower than the GeForce GTX 1080 on both pricing and performance.

How might NVIDIA price the 1070 Ti?

I see two possible scenarios with respect to the potential MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — assuming, of course, that it’s real and comes to market.

First, it could simply sit smack-dab in the middle of the GeForce GTX 1070 and GeForce GTX 1080 on the pricing table at around $439. The purpose of a GPU at that price would be to try to upsell potential GeForce GTX 1070 buyers who aren’t quite ready to drop the cash required on the GeForce GTX 1080.

That could work, but the added revenue from those upsells could be offset if some potential GeForce GTX 1080 buyers opted to go down a notch to the new GPU, saving some money with a product that’s “close enough” in performance.

Another possibility — and, frankly, it’s one that I think is more sensible — would be that NVIDIA would drop pricing on the GeForce GTX 1070, then slot in the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti at the about the price point that earlier product previously occupied.

Such a move would have the effect of increasing the performance-per-dollar of some of its offerings, potentially stimulating demand during the holiday season (which, not-so-coincidentally, is when several high-profile PC games are set to launch).

10 stocks we like better than Nvidia

When investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now… and Nvidia wasn’t one of them! That’s right — they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of September 5, 2017

Ashraf Eassa has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends NVIDIA. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

NVIDIA Corp. Reportedly Prepping GeForce GTX 1070 Ti | Markets-and-stocks

In May 2016, graphics chip specialist NVIDIA (NASDAQ: NVDA) began rolling gaming-oriented graphics processors based on its then-new Pascal architecture. The first products out of the chute were the GeForce GTX 1070 and its more powerful sibling, the GeForce GTX 1080, targeted at the high-end of the personal computer gaming market.

These processors were notable because they delivered substantial improvements in performance and power efficiency over their predecessors, thanks to the use of a new manufacturing technology, as well as significant design work on NVIDIA’s part. 

Since then, NVIDIA has released additional gaming products based on its Pascal architecture, including lower-power, lower-cost GPUs like the GeForce GTX 1060 and GeForce GTX 1050, and higher-end offerings like the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti and the brawny Titan Xp for gamers willing to spend big bucks for the best possible performance.

GPUs based on the Pascal architecture have been hugely successful for NVIDIA, helping to power significant growth in both the company’s gaming business and its booming data center accelerator business.

Per rumors from MyDrivers and Baidu, spotted by graphics card-oriented news website VideoCardz, NVIDIA is preparing a new Pascal-based graphics processor for the gaming market, to be called the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

Slotting in between the 1070 and 1080

NVIDIA’s MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 is $379 (though good luck finding one at this price, thanks to the cryptocurrency mining boom, which has dramatically increased demand for the GTX 1070, as well as other graphics processors). The GeForce GTX 1080’s MSRP sits $120 higher at $499.

Based on NVIDIA’s traditional naming scheme, the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti should be a higher-end product than the GeForce GTX 1070 but would sit lower than the GeForce GTX 1080 on both pricing and performance.

How might NVIDIA price the 1070 Ti?

I see two possible scenarios with respect to the potential MSRP for the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti — assuming, of course, that it’s real and comes to market.

First, it could simply sit smack-dab in the middle of the GeForce GTX 1070 and GeForce GTX 1080 on the pricing table at around $439. The purpose of a GPU at that price would be to try to upsell potential GeForce GTX 1070 buyers who aren’t quite ready to drop the cash required on the GeForce GTX 1080.

That could work, but the added revenue from those upsells could be offset if some potential GeForce GTX 1080 buyers opted to go down a notch to the new GPU, saving some money with a product that’s “close enough” in performance.

Another possibility — and, frankly, it’s one that I think is more sensible — would be that NVIDIA would drop pricing on the GeForce GTX 1070, then slot in the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti at the about the price point that earlier product previously occupied.

Such a move would have the effect of increasing the performance-per-dollar of some of its offerings, potentially stimulating demand during the holiday season (which, not-so-coincidentally, is when several high-profile PC games are set to launch).

10 stocks we like better than Nvidia

When investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now… and Nvidia wasn’t one of them! That’s right — they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of September 5, 2017

Ashraf Eassa has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends NVIDIA. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Nvidia’s rumoured GTX 1070 Ti is a needless final shot at AMD’s Vega

Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti specs

There are fresh rumours filtering out of forums in Scandinavia and the East that Nvidia are prepping a new Pascal-based hammer to bash that final nail into the AMD Vega coffin. That card is apparently the Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti.

Your graphics card deserves a good screen, so feed it one of the best gaming monitors around to see it blossom.

Now before we get too excited the only source for this is some snap that’s been circulating around the intermawebs appearing to show an Asus rig with a GTX 1070 Ti GPU inside it. That’s it. No one’s been able to confirm whether there is any shred of truth to the rumour or whether it’s just some Asus intern dropping extraneous letters onto their marketing shizzle.

But that hasn’t stopped the rumour getting fleshed out with alleged specifications, touting a GP104 GPU with either 2,048 or 2,304 CUDA cores inside and 8GB of video memory. For reference, the existing GTX 1070 has 1,920 cores and the GTX 1080 has 2,560. The former sounds more likey, as it would otherwise sit far too close to the GTX 1080 for comfort.

Nvidia GTX 1070 Ti

There’s always a chance that this is just evidence of Nvidia getting bored. With the spluttering launch that has been AMD’s RX Vega cards there’s almost no impetus for the GeForce engineers to move any quicker with the new Nvidia Volta GPU architecture. Any new Pascal release would kinda be like kicking a sickly puppy.

The existing Pascal cards are quick, efficient, and available which makes it very difficult for anyone to make a case for buying new AMD graphics silicon. Nvidia’s CEO has gone on record during a recent super-serious investor briefing saying that for the foreseeable future “Pascal is just unbeatable.”

So, the only reason for Nvidia to want to release an updated Pascal chip with the GTX 1070 Ti card is because they’re either bored or determined to stick another brogue into AMD’s bruised ribs. Maybe this is why Radeon Tech Group’s Raja Koduri has decided to take a break from GPU whispering until the start of next year – he knows there’s more punishment on the horizon.

Poor Vega...

The other big question everyone’s asking is where the hell will the GTX 1070 Ti fit into the existing graphics stack? There’s not a lot of clear air between the current GTX 1070 and GTX 1080, either in performance terms or pricing, so dropping a new card in between will surely cannibalise the sales of its older siblings. I guess there’s always the possibility of a price cut for the GTX 1070 to give a little space to the Ti card, but given the current pricing struggles of AMD’s GPUs there’s little need for that.

Whatever the truth of it, however, none of this makes for pleasant reading for AMD’s graphics card fans.

NVIDIA Rumored To Launch Pascal GeForce GTX 1070 Ti Graphics Card

So NVIDIA GeForce has been a silent bunch since the launch of the highly successful GeForce GTX 1080 Ti but rumor is that a new card may possible be in the works. Posted over at Chinese sources and caught by Videocardz, this new card is rumored to be known as the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti.

NVIDIA Rumored To Launch a Pascal Based GeForce GTX 1070 Ti Graphics Card With 8 GB G5 Memory

First of all, I would like to state that there’s no official confirmation of any sorts regarding this SKU so all of the details are rumors at best. The details allege that NVIDIA is working on what is to be a brand new Pascal graphics card. The card will be known as the GeForce GTX 1070 Ti and feature a Pascal GP104 silicon.

Technically, this card will be similar to the GP104 based GTX 1080 and GTX 1070. The differences will lie in the configuration of the chip itself. It is stated that the GTX 1070 Ti will come with 2304 CUDA Cores and 8 GB of GDDR5 memory along a 256-bit bus interface. Now this looks to be an interesting graphics card as it will be sandwiched in between the GTX 1070 and GTX 1080.

To be honest, that gap isn’t too huge to begin with. Also worth noting is that the GeForce GTX 1080 is retailing for $499 US while the GTX 1070 has an official MSRP of $349 US. The only price point I can think in between them is $399-$449. The former is too close to a GTX 1070 while the latter is close to a GTX 1080. And let’s just not talk about the GTX 1070 custom models which fall in the same price segment.

So maybe we are looking at a price drop on the GTX 1070 to around $299 US and a sudden intro of the GTX 1070 Ti after that. I know it sounds really weird but the only reason this rumor was worth a post was due to a picture a guy took with his mobile showing what seems to be ASUS’s GTX 1070 Ti STRIX OC (8 GB) model. Whether that’s true or not is yet to be confirmed but we will have a word with our sources if they have more details on the card. And no, Volta isn’t coming this year.



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Nvidia GTX 1070 vs. 1080: What’s the Best Value?

Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 10-Series GPUs have gone a long way in closing the gap between laptop and desktop graphics cards. Aside from a few tweaks, the 10-Series laptop GPUs are pretty similar. In the case of the GTX 1080 graphics card, both the laptop and desktop GPUs possess 2,560 CUDA cores.

asus-rog-g701vi-nw-g03
Both the GTX 1070 and 1080 are much more powerful than their lower-tier cousins (GTX 1050, 1050 Ti and 1060), but you’re going to pay a pretty penny for all that performance. So when you’re searching for that perfect gaming laptop, should you throw caution (and cash) to the wind and go for 1080 or exercise a bit of restraint and go for the less expensive, but still plenty powerful 1070? The following guide will help you find the right gaming powerhouse for you.

Specs Compared

As the upper echelon of the Nvidia mobile GPUs, the GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 both have 8GB of VRAM, which is double what you get on a GTX 1050. Both cards support Nvidia’s G-Sync, BatteryBoost, Optimus and Ansel technologies. Each GPU is also VR-ready and can be used in SLI configuration. Of course, there are some key differences. The 1080 has more CUDA cores and a higher clock speed (2,560 and 1,556 MHz) compared to the 1070 (2,048 and 1,442 MHz).

GeForce_GTX_1070_Front
Those added CUDA cores mean the 1080 can handle a higher workload capacity than any mobile card. But while the 1080 should definitely outperform the 1070 GPU, both GPUs can run popular AAA titles at the highest settings when set to 1920 x 1080. The GTX 1080, however, will have an easier go of things if you crank the resolution up to 4K.

Performance

The GTX 1080 has the cards firmly stacked in its favor, and it consistently edged out its less powerful counterpart in our tests. For these comparisons, we chose the Razer Blade Pro (GTX 1080), Asus ROG G701VI (GTX 1080), Alienware 15 (GTX 1070) and Lenovo Legion Y920 (GTX 1070) for their respective GPUs. Each laptop also has the same 2.9-GHz Intel Core i7-7820HK processor.

alienware-17-nw-g02-r4
During the Rise of the Tomb Raider benchmark, the Razer Blade Pro and Asus ROG G701VI, with their 1080 GPUs, scored 73 and 71 frames per second, respectively. The Lenovo Legion Y920 and Alienware 15 hit 59 fps and 52 fps.

  Razer Blade Pro
GTX 1080
Asus ROG G701VI
GTX 1080
Alienware 15
GTX 1070
Lenovo Legion Y920
GTX 1070
GTA V (fps) 81 90 68 71
Hitman (fps) 116 109 98 107
Metro Last Light (fps) 71 105 68 69
Rise of the Tomb Raider 73 71 52 59

On the Hitman test, the Blade Pro achieved 116 fps, but the Legion Y920 and Alienware 15 weren’t too far behind, at 107 and 98 fps. Switching over to Grand Theft Auto V, the G701VI obtained 90 fps, while the Blade Pro reached 81 fps. With their 1070 GPUs, the Legion Y920 and Alienware 15 notched 72 and 68 fps.

When we ran the Metro: Last Light benchmark, one of our most graphically taxing tests, the G701VI delivered a whopping 105 fps while the Blade Pro scored 71 fps. The Legion Y920 and Alienware 15 produced 69 and 68 fps.

MORE: The Best Gaming Laptops

To further test graphics performance, we ran the 3DMark Fire Strike test, on which the Blade Pro hit 14,120 while the Legion Y920 and Alienware 15 notched 13,803 and 13,523. The G701VI was an outlier, at 9,494.

During the SteamVR Performance test, which measures how VR-ready a system is, the G701VI, Blade Pro and Alienware 15 maxed out the test, at 11. The Legion Y920 was only slightly behind, at 10.6.

Which GPU Offers the Best Value?

Both the 1070 and 1080 are on the higher end of the GPU spectrum, which means both graphics cards can be expensive. To give you a little perspective, let’s take a look at the Alienware 17. The starting configuration is priced at $1,299 and has an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050 Ti GPU; the next model has a GTX 1060 and costs $1,479, while the 1070 GPU raises the price to $1,749.

alienware-17-nw-g03-r4
The GTX 1080 iteration of the Alienware 17 costs a whopping $2,299, partly due to its top-of-the-line graphics card and partly because of the system’s overclockable CPU. The other systems rely on 2.8-GHz Intel Core i7-7700HQ processors. But since you won’t find a GTX 1080 GPU without an overclockable processor, the top-tier Alienware 17 is a good representative of pricing for other high-end systems.

MORE: Which GPU is Right For You

Ultimately, consumers looking to split the baby between performance and price will want to select a gaming laptop equipped with a GTX 1070.

So Which GPU Should I Choose?

When you’re on the hunt for a gaming laptop, both the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 and 1080 GPUs are great choices. Gamers with deeper pockets and a thirst for power should invest in a gaming notebook with a GTX 1080. If your budget isn’t as large, get a 1070 laptop. Although it’s not as powerful as the 1080, it can still pack a punch on the gaming front. And if a single GPU isn’t satisfying your power cravings, check out laptops that offer SLI configurations. But whichever card you choose, don’t be afraid to crank the settings up to the max.

Help Me Laptop! Find a Nvidia 1070 GPU Gaming Notebook for Under $1,500

help me ltp gaming notebook  lead
For better or worse, gaming laptops can put a hurt on your wallet. Often, that means those of us constrained to a budget have to make some trade-offs to get a system that satisfies both our budgets and our games. Forum member,
Oliver_66 is in just such a predicament.

They’re currently on the hunt for a 15- or 17-inch gaming laptop with an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 GPU for under $1,700. However, Oliver_66 has also expressed an interest in the HP Omen.

Finding a 1070 system at Oliver’s asking price is going to be a little tricky. But never let it be said that I don’t enjoy a challenge. I managed to track down a few systems that meet the criteria.

First up, we’ve got the HP Omen 17. Priced at $1,799, this system earned Laptop Mag’s coveted Editors’ Choice award due to the machine’s great performance and vibrant 4K display. The model we reviewed has a 6th-Generation 2.6-GHz Intel Core i7-6700HQ processor with 16GB of RAM, but HP has recently refreshed the system with a 7th-Gen Core i7-7700HQ CPU.

Everything else, including the 512GB NVMe M.2 SSD and all-important Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 GPU with 8GB of VRAM remains the same. That means this notebook can play most games on high settings without any unsightly stuttering. It’s also a strong productivity machine and has lightning-fast transfer speeds, and it can support virtual reality headsets like the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive. The Omen 17 is a little more expensive than what Oliver_66’s looking to pay, but not so much that it shouldn’t be considered.

MORE: The Best Gaming Laptops

The Alienware 15 is also a great option. I reviewed several iterations of the laptop, including one with an overclocked Core i7 CPU. But to stay close to Oliver_66’s budget, I’m going to recommend that Oliver_66 swap out the GTX 1060 GPU on the $1,449 iteration for a 1070 card, which will bring the final cost to $1,799. Again, it’s a little over budget, but you get the desired GPU, with a powerful Intel Core i7-7700HQ CPU, 8GB of RAM, a 1TB 7,200-rpm hard drive and a lovely 1080p display.

Last, but not least, there’s the Acer Predator 15. Currently, priced at $1,649, it’s not the prettiest gaming laptop I’ve ever seen, but it’s got plenty of soft-touch finish. The Predator 15 has a last-gen Core i7 CPU, 16GB of RAM, a pair of 256GB SSDs in RAID 0 configuration, a 1TB hard drive and a 1070 GPU. The system also has a 1920 x 1080 display with Nvidia G-Sync technology, which should ensure smooth graphics no matter how high the settings are.

If Oliver_66 can stand to wait a few weeks, they might want to check out the new thin-and-light gaming laptops set to debut from Asus, MSI, Acer, Aorus and Clevo. Thanks to Nvidia’s Max-Q design, thin-and-light gaming laptops will soon be packing GTX 1070 GPUs and in some cases, 1080s. MSI’s Stealth Pro, one of the thinnest gaming laptops out there, will soon be available with an Nvidia GTX 1070 GPU. There’s no word on pricing just yet, but this machine is worth keeping in mind.

17-inch G-SYNC, Core i7-K, GTX 1070, TB3

Lenovo has expanded its lineup of Legion-branded gaming laptops with a model that features a 17” display, powerful audio, a mechanical keyboard, and an overclocking-capable Intel Core i7 microprocessor. The company positions its new gaming notebook for those who need maximum performance in a portable form-factor and will want to perform additional performance tuning.

For the better part of its history, Lenovo has focused primarily on mainstream and business PCs in a bid to drive volume and become one of the largest suppliers of computers in the world. However, as sales of PCs stagnated or dropped in the recent years, Lenovo has had to find a new source for its growth. One angle to this is when the company started to build gamers-friendly machines. At first they were released under the Y-series, such as the Y-700, but earlier this year Lenovo introduced its gaming PC brand: the Legion. So far, the Legion lineup has included only two 15.6” laptop models — the Legion Y520 and the Legion Y720. This month, the company is rolling out a considerably more powerful addition to the series, the Legion Y920 with a larger screen and better hardware, targeting the higher-end segment of the gaming laptop market. The Legion Y920 may not be addressing the ultra-premium part of the market, but the machine demonstrates a clear trend where Lenovo is going with its gaming notebooks.

The Lenovo Legion Y920 is equipped with a 17” FHD display with NVIDIA’s G-Sync and is powered by Intel’s Core i7-7820HK or Core i7-7700HQ processor (depending on exact SKU). The former processor features unlocked multiplier and thus can be overclocked rather easily as long as it has sufficient cooling. The laptop comes with 16 GB of DDR4 RAM, it uses NVIDIA’s GeForce GTX 1070 graphics adapter with 8 GB of GDDR5 memory as well as a 512 GB PCIe SSD and/or a 1 TB 2.5” HDD. As for connectivity, the Legion Y920 is equipped with one Thunderbolt 3 port, Rivet Networks’ Killer 2×2 802.11ac Wi-Fi and GbE, four USB 3.0 Type-A headers, a card reader, an HDMI header as well as a DisplayPort.

Meanwhile, two features of the Y920 that Lenovo is especially proud of are the audio sub-system featuring two JBL speakers and a subwoofer that carries the Dolby Home Theatre badge as well as an RGB LED-backlit mechanical keyboard.

Lenovo Legion Y920
  i7-7700HQ i7-7820K
Display 17.3″ IPS panel with 1920×1080 resolution and 75 Hz refresh
CPU Core i7-7700HQ (4C/8T, 6 MB, 2.8/3.8GHz) Core i7-7820HK (4C/8T, 8 MB, 2.9/3.9GHz)
Graphics NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 with G-Sync support
RAM 16 GB DDR4
Storage Up to 512 GB SATA SSD
1 TB HDD (optional)
Wi-Fi Rivet Killer Wireless-AC 2×2 802.11ac Wi-Fi
Bluetooth Bluetooth 4.1
Ethernet Rivet Killer E2x00 GbE controller
USB 4 × USB 3.0 Type-A
Thunderbolt × USB Type-C Thunderbolt 3 connector
Display Outputs 1 × DisplayPort
1 × HDMI
Keyboard Mechanical backlit keyboard with RGB LEDs and programmable buttons
Audio 2 × 2 W JBL speakers
1 × 3 W subwoofer
Other I/O Microphone, audio jacks, webcam (720p), card reader
Battery 90 Wh Li-Polymer
Dimensions Width: 425 mm/16.7″
Depth: 315 mm/12.4″
Thickness: 36 mm/1.41″
Weight 4.6 kilograms/10.14 lbs
Price Starts at $2700 or €2600, depending on configuration and market

With its 17” display, the Legion Y920 does not belong to what is now called ultra-portable gaming laptops category: it weighs 4.6 kilograms and its thickness is 36 mm, which is a result of using ABS plastic as the primary material for the chassis. Large dimensions enabled Lenovo to install a 90 Wh battery and could also let the manufacturer equip the laptop with a more advanced cooling system to boost overclocking potential of the Core i7-7820HK CPU. Unfortunately, Lenovo does not disclose any details about the cooling of the Legion Y920, but large dimensions, in general, mean more air.

Lenovo’s Legion Y920 will hit the market in EMEA this month and will start from €2,599.99 (including VAT). The machine will be available in the U.S. in June for the price of $2,699.99 for the base configuration.

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