Sacred nectar, Batman.

A retired British man managed to capture the striking image of a nectar licking a long-tongued bat while on vacation in Costa Rica.

John Hudson, 72, was visiting a nature reserve while he was on vacation and discovered bats by chance, according to SWNS. From there, he set up an improvised hiding place and began capturing images of the animals using their tongues lying down to sip the sweet nectar inside.

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Hudson said he spent three hours crouching to take the photos, a remarkable feat because the bats are nocturnal and feed only at night.

John Hudson, a 72-year-old semi-retired hypnotherapist, was visiting a nature reserve late at night when he met bats by chance. He spent three hours squatting in a makeshift skin to capture the images of the animals using their tongue to cover the nectar. (Credit: SWNS)

John Hudson, a 72-year-old semi-retired hypnotherapist, was visiting a nature reserve late at night when he met bats by chance. He spent three hours squatting in a makeshift skin to capture the images of the animals using their tongue to cover the nectar. (Credit: SWNS)

"The photos were taken around 11 pm, somewhere in the mountains, in a Costa Rica nature reserve," said Hudson in comments obtained by SWNS.

He continued: "Bats are quite common in the country, but nocturnal, so they are very difficult to photograph in the dark. The night before, sweet water was put in a manger in the hope of catching hummingbirds feeding – but none came. "

Hudson, who added that he had gone to the country to take pictures of birds using his DSLR Canon 5D Mark IV, said that he had been very lucky and that he was amazed at what he had been able to photograph.

  Extraordinary shots are almost never visible to the naked eye because bats feed at night and are notoriously difficult to spot. (Credit: SWNS)

Extraordinary shots are almost never visible to the naked eye because bats feed at night and are notoriously difficult to spot. (Credit: SWNS)

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"I have been passionate about photography since the age of 14 and have a special interest in hummingbirds," Hudson said. "You need to set up the equipment to automatically trigger a photo when a bat flies over, because you really can. I did not see anything. When I saw what I had captured, I was amazed. This is a beautiful series of photos that we rarely see. "

Follow Chris Ciaccia on Twitter @Chris_Ciaccia